Aquaculture part2

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Aquaculture part2
Aquaculture part2
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Aquaculture part2
 
 
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ecsports
Ol'Salt
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2012 10:34 am    Post subject: Aquaculture part2 Reply with quote

Is wild caught better? In some cases I have found wild caught fish to taste different just like you would in game. The majority of people however cannot tell the difference. Have you ever eaten a wild chicken, pig, cow or turkey (most have not)? Most people find they prefer the domestic animal over its wild counterpart. For some it is because the domestic animals have been bred certain ways, to gain this attribute and leave this one behind. Pigs today are 75% leaner today than they were on the 1950’s. This is because people wanted leaner meat. In the 50’s lard was a big business but as we have become more health conscious, agriculture and selective breeding has given us what we want. I love deer, dove, pheasant and duck meat. However, I find that many do not care for the slightly gamey flavor (my wife for one who was raised in the city). Have you ever heard someone eating a plate of seafood say “This tastes kinda fishey”. Well you are eating fish, but some (not me) are turned off by the fishey taste. We can do the same thing with fish that we do with pigs. This is one reason why you will find Tilapia in most seafood restaurants even though it is a freshwater fish. The meat is mild, white and has almost no “Fishy” taste. Personally I prefer an ocean caught hard head mullet over any fish in the ocean. Luckily hardhead mullets are one of the viable species here in NC since the Chinese stopped paying a premium for the roe.
Aquaculture does have a couple of drawbacks. Fish farms are expensive to build but with low interest loans and / or grants they become viable (although some are already standing on their own two feet). Fish farms also produce waste although not nearly like pig or turkey farms do. Some innovators have begun doing hydroponics in conjunction with aquaculture. This is called Aquaponics. Hydroponics is where plants are grown in a non nutritive media such as crushed stone and the roots are allowed to grow in nothing but fertilized water in which the plants grow faster and healthier. The water is fertilized via the waste of the fish. This means that in a small space you can grow fish, lettuce and cucumbers. Waste is utilized by the plants. This is innovation at its best
But Jobs, what about jobs? Aquaculture provides many jobs here in NC. As aquaculture takes off it will create jobs in every segment of our economy. We will need people to build the farms, people to run the farms, scientists to monitor the farms and business men to market the farms. There will be jobs lost in the commercial fishing industry since our fishery is in decline and there is nothing we can do about it except for restrict harvest which will eliminate some jobs while keeping others. If, our fishery collapses as it did for the New Englanders ALL the jobs will be lost for the commercial fishermen. Who better to raise the fish than the people who know fish. Commercial fishermen for the most part are hard working men and women who could hopefully transition into aquaculture. If we increase our fish production through aquaculture we will see an increase in jobs, a reduction of imports and healthier fish stocks in our ocean. With the state of our economy today innovation is the key. Aquaculture is a win win for NC. In my opinion, this is the only way we will be able to compete with foreign imports and still provide quality protein to our nations seafood eaters.
I hope this article will awaken ideas and innovation in you. I also hope that we as North Carolinians and Americans can start living in this century. There is money to be made and we need to be the ones to make it while leaving a sustainable fishery to our children and grandchildren.

Tight Lines and Fair Winds.
Capt Chris Medlin
  
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eric13
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2012 11:08 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Hey Chris, I swear I am not trying to start anything here but I would like to pose a question to you. Do you see the recreational fishing industry going to farm ponds as well like the carp ponds and catfish ponds of my home town? Or with the commercial sector firmly squared away in the pond business , will it allow the recreational sector to flourish in the fish infested waters that our absence will surely create?

Not trying to start anything, as you and I have a history already, just wonder where you see your industry in the aquaculture world of the future.

People can rod and reel fish in those same ponds that you are promoting, and then the real resource can rebound which is the REAL aim right?

For the record, I agree that aquaculture is the direction things are heading, and I have already started looking at different ways to get involved because I am not blind. But I dont have to be happy about it, and I am intensely suspicious of wolves in sheep's clothing offering help. (not calling you a wolf)
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ecsports
Ol'Salt
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2012 1:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Eric,

I have never said that the commercial fishing will or should go away. I do not support a full on net ban. I do however think there are better ways to harvest that will cause less impact (as far as by-catch and ecological problems) than many of the things we are doing now.

Rec fish ponds have their place just like aquaculture has its place. Our oceans are not and endless bounty that can not be fished out. Just ask the cod, pollock and haddock fishermen up north. we are at 8% biomass on menhaden now. Only 8 of the 35 species NCDMF regulates are viable. Why not do something about it now and at the same time stop sending our money overseas. We sacrafice our health and cash by buying imports that are not always raised in an ethical manner. Lets do it right and lets do it here.
Thanks for the reply Eric I am always happy to discuss (in a civil manner) my opinion with people who disagree. It helps to give me a broader perspective. Thanks for challenging me Eric.
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nc-state07
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2012 2:05 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I don't have extensive knowledge of aquaculture, but do have some concerns as to the quality of meat of a farm raised fish compared to "wild caught" fish. Lots of studies have shown the relationship between farm raised fish and high levels of toxic substances in their flesh. Here's a very small example of issues with farm raised salmon (don't feel like writing a thesis here)...this study even goes as far as recommending limits on a person's farmed salmon intake (no more than 6/yr):

http://www.news.cornell.edu/stories/Dec05/salmon.ssl.html

You can find lots of similar information on farm raised tilapia, etc. Don't really want to get into an in depth discussion, but knowing the nutritional hazards of farm raised vs. wild caught is important.

That being said, I would rather eat US farm raised seafood compared to overseas farm raised seafood. Just don’t want aquaculture to take the place of fresh, wild-caught seafood (i.e. real seafood).

PS - My grandmother lives in Venice, Fl on a golf course. Somehow tilapia were introduced into the golf course ponds (all interconnected). Within months, each pond was churning with tilapia. A company from up north came down and began netting and selling the fish to a NY seafood distribution company. If you know much about golf courses, you'll realize how many fertilizing chemicals are pumped onto the fairways and greens...each pond is a stormwater detention pond for these holes. Would never dream of eating anything out of those ponds, but a lucky someone is eating tilapia off the menu tonight!
  
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Desert1
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2012 2:32 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I guess there are no toxins in oceans,all those rivers running through big cities and agricultural areas dot pick up and toxins and plant them in the oceans where all those healthy fish we eat come from...  
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nc-state07
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2012 2:57 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Desert1 wrote:
I guess there are no toxins in oceans,all those rivers running through big cities and agricultural areas dot pick up and toxins and plant them in the oceans where all those healthy fish we eat come from...


Don't think you're getting my point. Never said the ocean was devoid of pollution. But a wild caught fish doesn't sit in a small reservoir its whole life being fed manufactured food pellets and rubbing slime with its neighbor. And if you think my grandmothers golf course pond is as clean as the ocean, then I'll ship you some fresh tilapia fillets next time I'm down!
  
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ecsports
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2012 3:39 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Both wild caught and farm raised have problems. Farm raised fish if not done properly can have a negative impact on the environment and if they are not raised in clean environments yield will be reduced as well as producing harmful bacteria. I do know that both of those problems can be avoided with proper procedures. Wild caught fish have pollution problems along with damage to the environment if not harvested in ecologically friendly ways. All of these problems with farmed and wild caught can be minimized if we put our minds to it.

For example, any yahoo with $36.00 can drag a shrimp trawl. Kill hundreds of pounds of by catch (7-1 to 20-1) and tear up the bottom.. However if that same guy wants to use a shrimp pot with wings that has almost no bycatch and does not disturb the bottom has to jump through hoops. Not to mention that a comm wanting to do the same is usually denied a permit to do it. Flounder can be harvested via gig with no by catch and some guys do better by harvesting that way as opposed to gill nets. There are ways to fix the system that will be profitable for comms while leaving us with a better fish stock for all.
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2012 4:27 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Freshwater shrimp (prawns) is an industry that is takin root in NC.
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stackchaser
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2012 9:45 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There is a fantastic book on the subject call Four Fish. The author goes into great detail on Cod, Salmon, Tuna, and Bass. There are several problems with farm raised fish. The amount of food given to the fish vs what you get out in lbs of cleaned fish. waste, gene science and introduction of genetically altered fish that escape into the wild and reproduce. I suggest all who are interested in this subject read the book. Written by a fisherman from a fisherman's perspective somewhat.  
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aftergolf
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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2012 10:29 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

There are a number of hybrid striper farms in NC already in full operation and making a profit.
http://www.ncagr.gov/markets/aquaculture/hybridsource.htm
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PostPosted: Thu Mar 08, 2012 12:21 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I can agree mostly with both sides of the fence. I think we should be on the leading edge with aquaculture in this state. We also need to preserve our commercial fishing heritage and our rec fishing industry. We can only do this if we have a VIABLE fishery. There is to much smoke and mirrors and political agendas. We are all mules in this business,if we pull as a team it want be that bad on any of us. The ocean,(that we ALL love so much) is one of GOD'S most wonderful creations, if we manage it wisely and for HIS glory it will feed us and our children right on and on. If we don't, hope ya like golf course tilapia. I'll take BBQ'D mullet on a charcoal grill :D
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smellyfish
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PostPosted: Fri Mar 09, 2012 12:33 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

A good friend of mine who also used to commercial fish is starting a prawn farm in Harnett county this year. Let me know if you inland guys need some shrimp come fall!!  
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QuickFix
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2012 10:43 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

http://www.thecoastguard.ca/News/2012-03-08/article-2919598/ISA-confirmed-at-Shelburne-fish-farm/1

Many things to consider with aquaculture. An outbreak in the wild fish populations could be devastating. Certainly something to think about!
  
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PostPosted: Sat Mar 10, 2012 7:19 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

Not trying to defend this operation, but according to the article the last case of this disease was 2004. Now this case was in 2009? So why is this published in 2012? Also, it looks like Canada has protocols in place to deal with the issue. They were already ordering pens to be cleaned and fish to be sacrificed. Even still, do you expect all industries to be flawless all the time? All operations in agriculture have to deal with diseases or crop failures from time to time. Again aquaculture is not perfect, but not all of aquaculture deals with the same issues.  
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2012 10:44 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

Married In wrote:
Not trying to defend this operation, but according to the article the last case of this disease was 2004. Now this case was in 2009? So why is this published in 2012? Also, it looks like Canada has protocols in place to deal with the issue. They were already ordering pens to be cleaned and fish to be sacrificed. Even still, do you expect all industries to be flawless all the time? All operations in agriculture have to deal with diseases or crop failures from time to time. Again aquaculture is not perfect, but not all of aquaculture deals with the same issues.


You misread the article I believe, 2004 case was Nova Scotia, 2009 case was Prince Edward Island, this new case, 2012, Nova Scotia again.

comparing agriculture to aquaciulture is apples to oranges in most regards especially when talking about disease and crop/stock failure!
  
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2012 11:40 am    Post subject: Reply with quote

I disagree. My point is that all of agriculture deals with these issues. To assume that fish culture is the only one that deals with diseases is not true. Pick a crop, and you can find a pesticide used to treat something on it. Yes, it is different that it is harder to spread to the wild from a row crop, but have you heard of hoof and mouth disease?? Point is, is that nothing is perfect, but it is always easier to find a problem. This is not an issue in NC in any case, and US aquaculture has less net pen production than most countries.  
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klbbigshow
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PostPosted: Sun Mar 11, 2012 10:02 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

overseas farm raised seafood is full of toxins because it takes harmful chemicals not allowed in the US to insure a disease free crop ,in the US we would not be as productive as a country where they don't enforce environmental laws  
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PostPosted: Mon Mar 12, 2012 1:20 pm    Post subject: Reply with quote

I'm going to go tour this place, seems odd that they could farm Cobia, let alone no where near the coast. So it should be interesting

http://www.virginiacobiafarms.biz/

I hear they are looking at trying Pompano too.
  
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