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41036
December 21, 2014 12:20 am EST
Location: 34.207N 76.949W
Wind Direction: NE (40°)
Wind Speed: 16 knots
Wind Gust: 17 knots
Atmospheric Pressure: 30.23 in (1023.7 mb)
Air Temperature: 50°F (9.9°C)
Dew Point: 46°F (7.7°C)
Water Temperature: 61°F (16.1°C)

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American Sportfishing Association

American Sportfishing Association · Total News: 27 · Total Reads: 23745

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Nationwide Survey Shows Most Americans Support Hunting and Fishing (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  U.S. Senate Passes Marine Fisheries Bill (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NRC Calls National Marine Fisheries Service Recreational Fisheries Data "Fatally (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Grant Funding Available for Chesapeake Bay Restoration Efforts (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Grant Funding Available for Chesapeake Bay Restoration Efforts (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Grant Funding Available For Phys-Ed Fishing Programs (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Future Fisherman Foundation Board Appoints New Executive Director (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Government Affairs Update (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  $800,000 in Grant Funding Available for Fish Habitat Restoration (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Sale of Public Land Proposal Withdrawn (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

Nationwide Survey Shows Most Americans Support Hunting and Fishing
by: Dawg
2006-10-23 06:25:44

Nationwide Survey Shows Most Americans Support Hunting and Fishing
by
Mary Jane Williamson

National Hunting and Fishing Day was officially established in 1972 to celebrate sportsmen and their role in fostering conservation and the scientific management of natural resources and wildlife. This year those celebrating National Hunting and Fishing Day will also be able to celebrate at least a decade of public support for their activities, according to a nationwide poll.

The nationwide survey, conducted by Responsive Management of Harrisonburg, Virginia, found that support for hunting and fishing has remained strong over the past decade with approximately every 3 out of 4 Americans approving of legal hunting and more than 9 out of 10 approving of recreational fishing.

"We have been seeing public support for hunting increase in several states over the past decade where we had data but this is the first nationwide study where we could verify that public support has increased over the past decade. In 1995, 73 percent of Americans approved of hunting while in 2006, 78 percent approved of hunting. Support for fishing nationwide, as well as in numerous states where we have conducted studies, remains very high," says Mark Damian Duda, executive director of Responsive Management. Although approval of fishing has decreased slightly, dropping only 1.7 percentage points from 95 percent in 1995 to 93.3 percent in 2006, most Americans approve of recreational fishing.

The results of this survey reflect the opinions of randomly selected U.S. adult residents based on a scientific telephone survey of 813 Americans conducted from August 31 to September 9, 2006. The sampling error is 3.44 percentage points.

The poll was conducted as part of two larger projects—a book being written on sportsmen’s issues by Duda, Marty Jones, and Andrea Criscione of Responsive Management that was commissioned by the Congressional Sportsmen’s Foundation and a study on the future of hunting and the shooting sports under a grant from the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service.

As Americans become more knowledgeable about the role of hunting in wildlife management as well as how much money hunting and fishing contributes to fish and wildlife conservation efforts, coupled with a visible increase in deer in urban areas and the need to actively manage their populations, Responsive Management’s research shows that the public continues to approve of hunting.

Officials in the hunting and fishing industries are encouraged by the public support, citing the important role that sportsmen play in a number of areas, including conservation and the economy. Steve Williams, current president of the Wildlife Management Institute and former director of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, noted, "Sportsmen are essential to wildlife protection and management. Game management programs, which are funded by sportsmen’s dollars, have brought back numerous wildlife species from unhealthy population levels, such as wild turkey, wood ducks, white-tailed deer, beaver, pronghorn antelope, and Canada geese to name a few. In addition, sportsmen’s dollars have purchased and managed millions of acres of fish and wildlife habitat benefiting all fish and wildlife species and the public who enjoy them."

Matt Hogan, executive vice president of the Association of Fish and Wildlife Agencies, pointed out, "Public support for hunting and fishing is crucial for conservation efforts. State fish and wildlife agencies have been and continue to be funded in large part by the contributions of sportsmen and women through license sales and excise tax payments on hunting and fishing equipment. To put it simply, without hunters and anglers, state fish and wildlife agencies would not be able to do their job conserving and managing wildlife for all Americans to enjoy."

Gordon Robertson, vice president of the American Sport Fishing Association, commented, "Hunting and fishing have major economic impacts on the U.S. economy. According to the National Survey of Fishing, Hunting, and Wildlife-Associated Recreation conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, sportsmen and women spend more than seventy billion dollars on hunting and fishing each year. Spreading that out across other sectors of the economy, sportfishing alone annually contributes $116 billion to the U.S. economy. It’s gratifying to know that the American public supports these activities with such a strong cultural heritage."

Responsive Management is a Virginia-based public opinion polling and survey research firm specializing in natural resources, fisheries, wildlife, outdoor recreation, and environmental issues and has been assessing public attitudes on these issues for 18 years. Surveys are conducted with scientific rigor according to the standards of the Council of American Survey Research Organizations. For more information, please visit the firm’s Web site:
www.responsivemanagement.com.

Poll Data:
Do you approve or disapprove of legal hunting? (2006)
45.4% Strongly approve and 32.2% Moderately approve (77.6% Approve)
4.9% Neither approve nor disapprove; 1.2% Don’t know
8.0% Strongly disapprove and 8.3% Moderately disapprove (16.3% Disapprove)

Do you approve or disapprove of recreational fishing? (2006)
68.5% Strongly approve and 24.8% Moderately approve (93.3% Approve)
1.5% Neither approve nor disapprove
2.0% Strongly disapprove and 3.2% Moderately disapprove (5.2% Disapprove)

Do you approve or disapprove of legal hunting? (1995)
40% Strongly approve and 33% Moderately approve (73% Approve)
5% Neither approve nor disapprove / Don’t know
11% Strongly disapprove and 11% Moderately disapprove (22% Disapprove)

Do you approve or disapprove of legal fishing? (1995)
65% Strongly approve and 30% Moderately approve (95% Approve)
2% Neither approve nor disapprove / Don’t know
1% Strongly disapprove and 2% Moderately disapprove (3% Disapprove)

The American Sportfishing Association is the sportfishing industry’s trade association, uniting more than 650 members of the sportfishing and boating industries with state fish and wildlife agencies, federal land and water management agencies, conservation organizations, angler advocacy groups, and outdoor journalists. The American Sportfishing Association safeguards and promotes the enduring social, economic, and conservation values of sportfishing.

 

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Aquarius Underwater Research Center

Aquarius Underwater Research Center · Total News:· Total Reads: 7357

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Aquarius Undersea Laboratory Wraps Up 2005 Mission Year with U.S. Navy Diving Pr (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Aquarius Undersea Laboratory Wraps Up 2005 Mission Year with U.S. Navy Diving Pr (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Lionfish adopt home away from home in Atlantic (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  UNDERWATER BREATHING APPARATUS EX14 (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  UNDERSEA HABITAT BECOMES EXPERIMENTAL HOSPITAL FOR NEEMO 7 (Dawg)

Most recent article:

Aquarius Undersea Laboratory Wraps Up 2005 Mission Year with U.S. Navy Diving Pr
by: Dawg
2006-01-05 03:21:03

Aquarius Undersea Laboratory Wraps Up 2005 Mission Year with U.S. Navy Diving Projects

The 2005 hurricane season will be remembered throughout the south for the damage and disruption inflicted upon millions, but it’s fair to say that the Aquarius underwater laboratory staff saw the wrath of the storms from a unique perspective — underwater. Aquarius survived the storms and ends the 2005 field season with a partnership project to help train US Navy saturation divers and develop new tools for scientific diving. Aquarius is owned by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) and operated by the NOAA Undersea Research Center at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington (NURC/UNCW). The habitat is located in sixty feet of water, 8 miles south of mission control in Key Largo. It is currently the only underwater laboratory operating in the world’s oceans.

It’s hard to imagine the underwater forces generated by 30 foot waves in 60 feet of water — thousands of tons of water are tossed as easily as a baby splashes water in a bathtub. Docks were battered, homes flooded, the 500 foot wreck of the Spiegel Grove was lifted from its sideways resting position to full upright status, and meters of sediments were moved around on the reef exposing coral skeletons buried for thousands of years. Aquarius also suffered damage but was repaired quickly to complete the 2005 mission year. Upon reaching Aquarius after the storms, Aquarius Manager, Jim Buckley, noted, "she had the look of a winning prize fighter who took a few licks but came out on top."

Hurricane Rita did more damage than Katrina or Wilma. "As Hurricane Rita passed south of the Keys as a Category I Storm, its wave heights reached nearly 30 feet off Key Largo. This type of surge has been known to tear shipwrecks in two and scatter them hundreds of feet across the bottom of the ocean," said Craig Cooper, Operations Director for Aquarius. He added, "The surge and constant wind–driven currents from the east–southeast shifted Aquarius approximately ten feet, broke a pin to one of the legs, and threatened to tip the habitat over. Additionally, hold down anchors were pried from the seafloor, and exterior deck frames, battery pods, and other structures were damaged or torn loose." A tiger team of U.S. Navy Seabee divers from Underwater Construction Teams (UCT) 1 and 2, divers from Mobile Diving and Salvage (MDSU 2), and NURC/UNCW divers collaborated in the many tasks associated with stabilizing and restoring the underwater habitat in record time. Their efforts paid off — Aquarius survived Hurricane Wilma without any damage, despite a direct hit on the Florida Keys. LT CDR Tim Liberatore, UCT 2 Commanding Officer stated that "the UCTs are perfectly suited for this type of work, stabilizing the Aquarius was a great opportunity to do real world engineering on an underwater structure."

Aquarius is a national asset that supports scientists, researchers, and astronauts in their efforts to better understand the oceans, coastal resources, and the ability to conduct work operations in a difficult, remote, and potentially dangerous environment. Science projects conducted from Aquarius are contributing knowledge and discoveries that help managers better understand and conserve coral reef resources in the Florida Keys National Marine Sanctuary. Important results include studies related to nutrients and pollution, monitoring deep reef conditions, coral feeding biology, dynamics of seaweed populations, and in the most recent mission this past November, acoustic fish tracking studies of black grouper and other species.

The goals of the December Navy projects are to furnish United States Navy Diving saturation school graduates an opportunity to work with Aquarius in a setting that simulates saturation diving procedures related to the Navy’s use of a "flyaway saturation system." Two back–to–back five day missions will each include five Navy divers with one NURC/UNCW habitat technician, NURC Diving Safety Officer (DSO) Roger Garcia, a former Navy diver himself. Excursions from the habitat will involve typical "surface supplied" umbilical diving with "hard hat" helmets, with the wet porch serving as an analog to a saturation diving bell. Tasks will benefit NOAA’s habitat program and include inspections of the habitat exterior structures and baseplate, further installation of baseplate stabilization/hurricane seabed anchors, and general maintenance prior to the off–mission season.

During each Aquarius mission, anyone with Internet access can watch live web cameras, read expedition journals from the aquanauts, view project summaries and pictures, and much more at the NURC/UNCW Aquarius web site: www.uncw.edu/aquarius

For more information, contact Otto Rutten, Associate Director or Craig Cooper, Operations Director, NURC/UNCW at (305) 451–0233.

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Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commiss

Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commiss · Total News: 41 · Total Reads: 34678

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  ASMFC Approves Atlantic Menhaden Amendment 2 (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NOAA Fisheries Publishes a Final Rule for South Atlantic Snapper-Grouper Amendme (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Federal Fisheries Management Council Approves Measures to Protect Largest Deepwa (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Nontraditional Stakeholders Sought for Participation in ASMFC Shad & River Herri (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  ASMFC Releases Draft Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic Coastal Sha (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission to Meet; Aug 14-17 in Arlington, VA (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  ASMFC Board Approves Addendum XVI to the Summer Flounder, Scup, and Black Sea Ba (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Atlantic Coastal States Schedule Public Meetings to Gather Input on Coastal Shar (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Horseshoe Crab Board Approves Draft Addendum for Public Comment (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Summer Flounder, Scup, and Black Sea Bass Board Approves Draft Addendum XVIII fo (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

ASMFC Approves Atlantic Menhaden Amendment 2
by: Capt_Dave
2012-12-17 13:46:09

ASMFC Approves Atlantic Menhaden Amendment 2

Baltimore, MD – The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission has approved Amendment 2 to the Interstate Fishery Management Plan for Atlantic Menhaden. The Amendment establishes a 170,800 MT total allowable catch (TAC) beginning in 2013 and continuing until completion of, and Board action on, the next benchmark stock assessment, scheduled for 2014. The TAC represents a 20% reduction from the average of landings from 2009-2011 and an approximately 25% reduction from 2011 levels. The Board also adopted new biological reference points for biomass based on maximum spawning potential (MSP), with the goal of increasing abundance, spawning stock biomass, and menhaden availability as a forage species.

“Through the selection of the MSP-based reference points, beginning with adoption of Addendum V in 2011 and continuing today, the Board has made a conscious decision to address the ecosystem services provided by Atlantic menhaden,” stated Board Chair Louis Daniel of North Carolina. “Given the stock is experiencing overfishing and is most likely overfished based on the newly adopted reference points, it was incumbent upon the Board to reduce landings in order to ensure the long-term sustainability of the resource and the fisheries that depend on it.”

The Amendment allocates the TAC on a state-by-state basis based on landings history of the fishery from 2009-2011; allocation will be revisited three years after implementation. Further, it reduces the Chesapeake Bay reduction fishery harvest cap by 20% (this is an adjustment of cap which was in place since 2006). States will be required to close their fisheries when the state-specific portion of the TAC has been reached; any overages must be paid back the following year. The Amendment includes provisions to allow for the transfer of quota between states and a bycatch allowance of 6,000 pounds for non-directed fisheries that are operating after a state TAC has been landed.  The Amendment also establishes requirements for timely reporting and improved biological monitoring.

For more information, please contact Mike Waine, Fishery Management Plan Coordinator, at mwaine@asmfc.org or 703.842.0740.

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Bill Fish Foundation

Bill Fish Foundation · Total News:· Total Reads: 4274

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  The Billfish Foundation Call To Action (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Fishing Year & the 250 Rule (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  KEY GOVERNMENT OPTIONS for BILLFISH and SWORDFISH (Dawg)

Most recent article:

The Billfish Foundation Call To Action
by: Dawg
2005-08-02 04:24:41

The Billfish Foundation Call To Action

The Billfish Foundation is requesting that you, and members on Capitol Hill who understand the importance of recreational fishing, the importance of the U.S. taking the lead to find solutions through research to reduce billfish bycatch in longline vessels and the importance of having billfish in the water to support the many U.S. businesses dependent upon responsible use of the resource.

Through the great efforts of Senator Trent Lott (R-MS) and former Senator John Breaux (D-LA) the first Atlantic billfish research funds were approved for 2004. Most of those funds were distributed through the Gulf of Mexico Marine Fisheries Commission by competitive bids. The small balance was given to the Miami Lab of the NMFS, South East Fisheries Science Center for scheduled billfish work.

Your assistance is requested to try to secure research funds for Atlantic billfish, a respectable amount for competitive bids and another respectable amount for the Miami Lab for billfish research projects.

A sample letter is provided below and TBF requests that you either copy and send with your name added, or modify noting your state of residence, any other comments you would like to add and then add your name and send to Senator Trent Lott (R-MS), Senator Richard Shelby (R-AL) and Senator Thad Cochran (R-MS) as soon as possible. Senator Lott has requested $4.3 million, we should thank him for taking that action and then stress we would like to see that amount supported by the other two Senators and approved for fiscal year 2006.


SEND TO THESE ADDRESSES:
Senator Trent Lott
email: senatorlott@lott.senate.gov
fax: (202) 224-2262
mail: SR-Russell Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510-2403

Senator Richard Shelby
email: senator@shelby.senate.gov
fax: (202) 224-3416
mail: SH-110 Hart Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510-0103

Senator Thad Cochran
email: senator@cochran.senate.gov
fax: (2020) 224-9450
mail: SD-113 Dirksen Senate Office Building
Washington, DC 20510-2402



Dear Senators Trent Lott, Richard Shelby, and Thad Cochran,

As a member of The Billfish Foundation (TBF), I am asking that you help secure needed research funds for Atlantic billfish in the 2006 federal appropriations. These funds are essential for insuring the continued availability of Atlantic billfish for recreational fishing opportunities, for the health of the multi-billion dollar industry dependent upon the availability of billfish and the healthy balance of our ocean ecosystems.

Most of the mortality of Atlantic billfish comes as bycatch on the hooks of other nations, nations that have no interest in the U.S. recreational fishery, in the U.S. manufacturing and retail businesses related to offshore fishing and boating, nor do they have any interest in the U.S. businesses that provide support services for citizens and tourists who travel to our coasts to fish. Recovery of Atlantic marlin is going to require a significant reduction in their mortality when killed as bycatch by longline vessels, particularly foreign longline vessels. These other countries will not invest in research to try to find constructive solutions, that is going to take U.S. funding and once solutions are found those solutions can then be exported to other countries.

If the U.S. fails to fund research that can find solutions to meet these objectives the data gaps in what is known about white marlin will contribute to its possible listing in 2007 under the Endangered Species Act (ESA). A listing would have the greatest negative impact on all U.S. fisheries that use waters where a white marlin "might" be hooked - the Atlantic, Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean.

The funds secured for this important research in 2004 were an important beginning, though much more still needs to be done.

It is inexcusable that the National Marine Fisheries (NMFS) again failed to insist that funds be included in their 2006 budget request to cover billfish research, research needed to help find solutions to reverse the decline of billfish populations and to improve management tools. We greatly appreciate the request already by Senator Lott for funds for Atlantic billfish research and hope that request will be supported by others. Good conservation is good economics, healthy billfish stocks means a healthy economy for the related businesses.

Research takes years of gathering data, getting larval samples from the ocean, testing new hypothesis for assessing population levels, determining age and growth rates, and placing traditional and satellite tags to determine essential fish habitat for spawning areas, nursery areas and movement patterns, to name just a few research categories that need funding.

The recreational billfish community respectfully calls upon you to include in this 2006 budget request funds for Atlantic billfish research. Your leadership on this important issue will be greatly appreciated.

Sincerely,

Please contact Ellen Peel, President of The Billfish Foundation with any questions or comments you may have.

She can be reached at:
Ellen Peel, President
The Billfish Foundation
Phone: 954-938-0150 ext 108
http://www.billfish.org/

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Bluefin Tuna News

Bluefin Tuna News · Total News: 19 · Total Reads: 25257

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Fishermans Death (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Letter sent to the National Marine Fisheries Service (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  ATLANTIC BLUEFIN TUNA LANDINGS (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Bluefin Tuna fishing on National TV (captjohn86)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Bluefin Season to REOPEN! (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  BFT Season and Size Limit Adjustments (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  MARINE PATROL AUCTIONS TUNA (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  GENERAL CATEGORY BFT FISHERY WILL CLOSE DECEMBER 10, 2003 (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Atlantic Bluefin Tuna: International Management of a Shared Resource (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  ATLANTIC BLUEFIN TUNA LANDINGS (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

Fishermans Death
by: Capt_Dave
2004-12-09 13:44:51

Fisherman Dies While Fighting Tuna

A fisherman discovered an empty boat cruising off the North Carolina coast Tuesday morning with its harpoon line in the water.

When he reeled in the line, he found a live bluefin tuna speared on the end -- and the captain's entangled body.

The captain, Bruce Bartlett of South Plainfield, N.J., apparently harpooned the fish, then got his left leg caught in the 200-foot line, Coast Guard officials said. When the tuna swam away, Bartlett was pulled into the ocean off Morehead City and drowned.

Bartlett was a commercial fisherman who traveled up and down the coast, Coast Guard officials said. He was alone in the 35-foot boat, named Flat Calm, when he died, fighting a fish that can weigh from 200 to 500 pounds.

"They're not easy to handle by yourself," said Ensign Andy Green-wood, with the Coast Guard's Fort Macon group.

Greenwood said Bartlett's was one of several boats that left Morehead City early Tuesday. He was last seen at 8 a.m.

About 9:30 a.m., another fisherman found Bartlett's boat 13 miles offshore, its motor running. The man climbed aboard and pulled up about 150 feet of the line before finding Bartlett's body, Greenwood said. The catch was on the line, but it got away before Coast Guard officials arrived.

Efforts to reach Bartlett's family Wednesday were unsuccessful.

Anthony Ng of Winterville, a commercial fisherman who was also in the area Tuesday morning, said 6- and 7-foot swells were battering the boats.

He said many fishermen work alone, hauling in tuna on giant rods, then stabbing them with harpoons and chasing them until they tire. A single tuna can sell for thousands of dollars.

Ng said it is more profitable to work alone but, of course, more dangerous. "Those fish, they pull hard," he said. "All it takes is one slip."

The Coast Guard advises against fishing alone. But even having company can't always prevent accidents. In 1994, a man was pulled overboard during the Morehead City-based Big Rock Blue Marlin Tournament. He had wrapped line around his arm and was trying to pull a fish aboard a 52-foot boat. His body was never found.

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Cape Fear Blue Water Fishing Club

Cape Fear Blue Water Fishing Club · Total News: 57 · Total Reads: 37850

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Spring Challenge Blue Water Open Standings (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Cape Fear Blue Water Fishing Club (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  4th Annual Battle of The Beach's (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  "Sponsors Appreciation Dinner" (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Cape Fear Blue Water Fishing Club (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Next Meeting of The Cape Fear Blue Water Fishing Club (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Cape Fear Blue Water Open (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Carolina Beach Inlet (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Blessing of The Fleet (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Cape Fear Bluewater Fishing Club - "Blessing of the Fleet" (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

Spring Challenge Blue Water Open Standings
by: Dawg
2008-05-19 07:55:29

Spring Challenge Blue Water Open Standings

Here are the final standings for last weekends tournament.
 
Tuna 1st Place - Box Office 36.6lbs
Tuna 2nd Place - Slow Poke 33.6lbs
 
Dolphin 1st Place - Tuna Trappe 40.25lbs
Dolphin 2nd Place - Chicken Ship 35.95lbs
 
Wahoo 1st Place - Fish Hooker 70.0lbs
Wahoo 2nd Place - Frick N Fishin 55.7lbs
 
Thanks again to the Captains, Crew members and sponsors for making this a great tournament.   Capt. Rich

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Center for Biological Diversity

Center for Biological Diversity · Total News: 24 · Total Reads: 22096

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Center for Biological Diversity applauds resignation of Secretary of Interior Ga (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  STUDY FINDS ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT IS A SUCCESS! (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Anti-Endangered Species Bill in Senate (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  KILLER WHALES PROTECTED AS ENDANGERED (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Judge Approves Settlement To Protect Atlantic White Marlin From Longline Fishing (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES GUTS ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  ASSAULT ON SCIENCE AT FISH & WILDLIFE SERVICE PROVOKES SHARP CRITICISM BY MORE T (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  FLORIDAâ€â„ (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  FLORIDAâ€â„ (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  ORCAS WILL BE PROTECTED UNDER ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

Center for Biological Diversity applauds resignation of Secretary of Interior Ga
by: Dawg
2006-03-12 05:19:53

Center for Biological Diversity applauds resignation of Secretary of Interior Gale Norton

Controversial appointee exemplified revolving door between industry, anti-environmental lobby groups, and Bush administration

Tucson, Ariz. - The Center for Biological Diversity applauds today’s announcement by presidential appointee Gale Norton that she is resigning as Secretary of Interior. Norton used her post as the nation’s top environment official to dismantle wildlife and wilderness protections; expand oil drilling, mining, and logging on public lands; and squash efforts by government scientists to establish rational environmental policy. Under her tenure, agency morale declined to an all-time low and millions of acres of land were forever scarred.

"It’s a good day for wildlife, wilderness and anyone who cares about America’s natural heritage," said Michael Finkelstein, executive director of the Center for Biological Diversity.

Norton worked under James Watt in the Reagan Administration, left to work for the mining, oil, and timber industries, moved on to become a lobbyist for anti-environmental groups, then returned to government in the Bush administration. "Norton exemplifies the corruption-inducing revolving door between the Bush administration and industry," said Finkelstein, "the fox wasn’t just guarding the henhouse, she burned it down."

Norton’s resignation comes as law enforcement officials investigate whether top Interior official Steven Griles favored the clients of Jack Abramoff. Griles was a coal industry lobbyist elevated to one of the Interior Department’s top posts at the recommendation of Norton.

The Center for Biological Diversity is a nonprofit conservation organization with more than 18,000 members dedicated to protecting endangered species and wild places through science, policy, education, and environmental law.

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Charlotte Offshore Sportfishing Club

Charlotte Offshore Sportfishing Club · Total News:· Total Reads: 5273

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Mercury and Sportsman Magazines Present Fishing Schools (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Charlotte Offshore Sport Fishing Club (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Long Bay Artificial Reef Association (Dawg)

Most recent article:

Mercury and Sportsman Magazines Present Fishing Schools
by: Dawg
2006-03-07 04:17:54

Congrats to Capt. Rob Ferris and Team Mad Mouse for a 4th place finish in their first SKA PRO event. Way to go guys!!!

Mercury and Sportsman Magazines Present Fishing Schools

If you would like to improve or tune up your fishing skills for the
2006, there is still time to register for one of the upcoming North Carolina
or South Carolina Sportsman Fishing Schools.

For the fourth year, Mercury Marine has teamed with the N.C.
and S.C. Sportsman Magazines to present the popular 2006 Sportsman
Fishing Schools. The schools will feature noted tournament anglers,
charter captains, guides, pro team members, and knowledgeable local
fishermen in a multiple session, lecture and hands-on format aimed at
improving the skills and knowledge of beginning to intermediate level fresh
and salt water fishermen.

The schools will be presented in conjunction with the North
Myrtle Beach Parks and Recreation Department at the J. Bryan Floyd
Community Center, N. Myrtle Beach, S.C., on Saturday February 25,
Holly Springs Parks and Recreation Department at the W.E. Hunt Community Center, Holly Springs, N.C., on March 11 and Greenville Recreation
and Parks Department at South Central High School, Greenville, N.C.,
on Saturday March 18.

Each school will be an all day event, beginning at 9:00 AM and ending at
4:30 PM. The schools are organized with multiple classrooms, each
featuring one of the different subject groups of Inshore Saltwater,
Ocean Saltwater, Fresh Water, General Information, and Outside Instructions.
The individual sessions will change hourly and participants will choose their preferred topic each hour.

The sessions in the Inshore Saltwater Classroom will include Speckled
Trout, Flounder, Puppy Drum, Tarpon and more.

The Saltwater Ocean Classroom sessions will include Nearshore Trolling
for Spanish Mackerel, Bluefish, and King Mackerel, Offshore Trolling for Tuna, Dolphin, and Wahoo, Live Bait Trolling for King Mackerel and more.

The Fresh Water Classroom sessions will include, Bass, Catfish,
Stripers, Mountain Trout, Panfish, and Fly Fishing.

The General Information Classroom will include sessions on Basic Navigation and Safety, Marine Electronics, Basic Marine Preventive
Maintenance, Reading and Understanding Charts, Three Basic Knots,
Chumming and more.

The Outside Instruction sessions will include Setting Up and
Maintaining Trailers, Rigging Offshore Trolling Baits, Selecting and
Throwing Cast Nets and more.

Many sponsors and partners have come together to make these
schools possible. They include Mercury Marine, Sea Pro Boats,
Road King Trailers, Bass Pro Shops, Sea Striker, Star Rods, Calcutta
Baits, Maps Unique, Nautical publications, Charter Lakes Marine Insurance, Chatlee Boat and Marine, and the Greenville, Holly Springs and
N. Myrtle Beach Recreation and Parks Departments.

Some of the key instructors include: Capt. Jerry Dilsaver, 2001
SKA National Champion, 1998 USAA Angler of the Year and North Carolina Sportsman Magazine Staff Writer; Capt. Maynard Edwards, Yadkin Lakes
Guide Service; Capt. David Dietzler, Cape Lookout Charters; Capt.
Rick Bennett, Rod-Man Charters; Capt. Greg Voliva, Down East Guide
Service, and Capt. John Parks, 2005 Wal-Mart FLW Kingfish Tour National Champion.

For the low cost of $55 ($65 in the final week before each event),
each participant will receive the day of instruction, a years subscription or renewal to North Carolina or South Carolina Sportsman Magazine, lunch, a Sportsman T-shirt, manufacturer’s samples, many door prizes including
fishing tackle and fishing trips, and entry into a drawing to win a Sea Pro Boat, Mercury Outboard and Road King Trailer combination. Additional family members may register for only $30 each ($35 in the final week before each event).

For more information or to register, visit www.northcarolinasportsman.com, www.southcarolinasportsman.com or call 1-800-538-4355.

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Coastal Conservation Association

Coastal Conservation Association · Total News: 62 · Total Reads: 45561

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  CCA Announces Scholarship Selections (zotsboy)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Donate Boat, Trailer, Car to Help Rec Fishery (muddler)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  CCA NC looking to Grow Chapters (muddler)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  CCA North Carolina Names Stephen Ammons as its New Executive Director (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  2007 CCA NC Inside & Out Results (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  RED DRUM ADVISORY COMMITTEE SETS DATE FOR GILL NET DISCUSSION (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Inside & Out Tournament (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Red Drum Advisory Committee voted in favor of increasing the daily commercial tr (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Cape Fear CCA (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Conservationists Demand Science-based Summer Flounder Solution (Dawg)
· More -->

Most recent article:

CCA Announces Scholarship Selections
by: zotsboy
2009-07-06 15:40:26

 

CCA Announces Scholarship Selections
 
The Coastal Conservation of North Carolina -- an association dedicated to preserving and protecting our marine fisheries for current and future generations -- announced that it has selected two students to receive a $1,000 scholarship each to further their educational goals in the area of Marine Science.
 
"We look for students doing work in the area of Marine Science who have projects that will be of benefit long term to the fishermen of North Carolina" said Stephen Ammons, Executive Director of CCA NC.  
 
After reviewing the candidates for the two $1,000 scholarships for 2009, the selection committee reached an unanimous agreement on two students -- Ken Riley from East Carolina University Department of Biology and Nate Giraldi from the University of North Carolina Institute of Marine Sciences.
 
Ken Riley is seeking his doctoral degree at East Carolina with his project focused on American Shad and River Herring.  His research work will model various elements of essential nursery habitat for these species in an effort to improve the management of these types to insure a healthy resource. He will include important environmental factors such as river flow and predator - prey relationship.
 
Nate Giraldi is seeking his doctorate also in Marine Sciences. His thesis will conduct research on oyster sanctuaries to determine optimal planting strategies, methods to improve growth and survival, identify predators to understand and improve success of artificial reefs, and measure recruitment to the artificial oyster reefs. Oysters filter our coastal waters and are important in improving water quality and habitat.
 
Both of these projects are vital to the overall health of North Carolina fisheries and are consistent with the many efforts of CCA NC to improve our marine resources.
 
 
 
The stated purpose of the Coastal Conservation Association North Carolina is to advise and educate the public on conservation of marine resources.  The objective of CCA is to conserve, promote and enhance the present and future availability of these coastal resources for the benefit and enjoyment of the general public.
For more Information please visit www.ccanc.org
 

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Coastal Ocean Research and Monitoring

Coastal Ocean Research and Monitoring · Total News:· Total Reads: 5543

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NOAA Joins with Carolinasâ€Ã (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Frying Pan Buoy Deployed (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Coastal Ocean Research and Monitoring Program (CORMP) (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Coastal Ocean Research and Monitoring Program (CORMP) (Dawg)

Most recent article:

NOAA Joins with Carolinasâ€Ã
by: Dawg
2007-04-03 07:40:30

NOAA Joins with Carolinas’ Universities to Test New Marine Web Portal for Carolinas’ Coastline

Integrates Real-Time Data from Eight Major Providers at One Marine Site
The Carolinas’ Coast Marine Web Portal, a new experimental website that
integrates real-time marine data from eight major providers will be
launched by NOAA’s National Weather Service in Wilmington, N.C.,
Morehead City, N.C., Charleston, S.C., NOAA’s Ocean Prediction Center,
University of South Carolina and University of North Carolina at
Wilmington’s Center for Marine Science, on April 2, 2007.
http://www.weather.gov/carolinascoast

This new marine web portal will be a gateway for marine customers and
partners to access a variety of real-time marine observations, hazards
and forecasts along the Carolina coastline all at one site integrating
real-time data from eight major providers.
The site current integrates data from the following providers: National
Weather Service (NWS); National Ocean Service; National Data Buoy
Center; Coastal Ocean Research Monitoring Program; Carolina’s Coastal
Ocean Observing and Prediction System Stations, that are owned and
operated by the University of South Carolina and North Carolina State
University; United State Geological Survey, Federal Aviation
Administration, Department of Defense, and The Skidaway Institute of
Oceanography.

“At the National Weather Service we are always striving to provide our
customers and partners with the most innovative and useful water,
weather and climate information to help save lives and property,” said
NOAA’s NWS John Guiney, chief, Meteorological Services. “The Carolinas’
Coast Marine Web Portal provides our customers with one-site to easily
obtain all the marine data they need to safely chart their course along
the Carolina coastline,” he continued.
The Carolinas’ Coast Marine Web Portal is an experimental product to
test new methods in delivering both NOAA source data and data from
partners in a web application that integrates both meteorological and
geographic information.
Funding affiliates for this project were the Southeast Atlantic Coastal
Ocean Observing System, Southeast Costal Ocean Observing Regional
Association, and South Carolina Sea Grant.
“We are really excited about this integrative approach that provides
mariners everything they might need for safe passage all at one site. We
are inviting our customers and partners to view the portal and provide
their comments by September 30, 2007. This will allow us to evaluate
this product and its future development to best meet needs of the
mariner community,” said NOAA’s NWS Michael Caropolo,
meteorologist-in-charge, Wilmington, North Carolina.
Carolinas’ Coast Marine Web Portal provides access to current
observations, land and sea surface temperatures, official NWS five day
forecasts and warnings, radar data, wind speeds and directions, wind
gusts, air pressure and coastal bathymetry for a distance of 250
nautical miles from the Carolina coastline. Web users will easily find
the right transmission frequency for NOAA’s All-Hazard Weather Radio
anywhere along the coast of the Carolinas.
All data is available in text and graphical formats and different
datasets may be overlaid on the geographic map providing a comprehensive
view of the weather.

Customers and partners are invited to fill-out a feed-back survey after
reviewing the site. The link to the survey is
http://www.weather.gov/survey/web-survey.php?code=cc-marine

This is an experimental product and availability and content of the web
portal may change at any time. Users are cautioned that the National
Weather Service is not responsible for non-NOAA data and should use
official National Weather Service forecasts and advisories for their
critical weather needs.
The National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, an agency of the
U.S. Commerce Department, is celebrating 200 years of science and
service to the nation. From the establishment of the Survey of the Coast
in 1807 by Thomas Jefferson to the formation of the Weather Bureau and
the Commission of Fish and Fisheries in the 1870s, much of America's
scientific heritage is rooted in NOAA.
NOAA is dedicated to enhancing economic security and national safety
through the prediction and research of weather and climate-related
events and information service delivery for transportation, and by
providing environmental stewardship of our nation's coastal and marine
resources. Through the emerging Global Earth Observation System of
Systems (GEOSS), NOAA is working with its federal partners, more than 60
countries and the European Commission to develop a global monitoring
network that is as integrated as the planet it observes, predicts and
protects.


On the Web:
NOAA: www.noaa.gov
National Weather Service: www.weather.gov
Program Partners
Carolinas Coastal Marine Web Portal: http://www.weather.gov/carolinascoast
Mariner’s Survey:
http://www.weather.gov/survey/web-survey.php?code=cc-marine
National Weather Service, Wilmington, N.C.: http://www.erh.noaa.gov/er/ilm/
National Weather Service, Morehead City, N.C.:
http://www.erh.noaa.gov/er/mhx/
National Weather Service, Charleston, S.C.: http://www.erh.noaa.gov/er/chs/
University of North Carolina’s Center for Marine Science, Wilmington;
Coastal Ocean Research Monitoring Program: http://www.cormp.org
Carolina’s Carolinas Coastal Ocean Observing and Prediction System,
owned and maintained by the University of South Carolina and North
Carolina State University: http://www.caro-coops.org/
Funding Affiliates:
Southeast U.S. Atlantic Coastal Ocean Observing System:
http://www.seacoos.org/
Southeast Costal Ocean Observing Regional Association:
http://www.secoora.org/
North Carolina Sea Grant: http://www.ncseagrant.org/
South Carolina Sea Grant: http://www.scseagrant.org/

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Deep Sea Conservation Coalition

Deep Sea Conservation Coalition · Total News:· Total Reads: 0

Articles:

...There aren't any news yet for this topic...

Department of the Interior

Department of the Interior · Total News:· Total Reads: 1294

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  ULTRALIGHT MIGRATION LEADS 18 ENDANGERED WHOOPING CRANES OVER THE SKIES (Dawg)

Most recent article:

ULTRALIGHT MIGRATION LEADS 18 ENDANGERED WHOOPING CRANES OVER THE SKIES
by: Dawg
2006-12-07 06:40:43

ULTRALIGHT MIGRATION LEADS 18 ENDANGERED WHOOPING CRANES OVER THE SKIES
OF GEORGIA


Pike County, Ga. (December 5, 2006) - Eighteen whooping crane chicks
have crossed into the state of Georgia, continuing their journey from
Wisconsin to Florida by reaching Gordon County, Georgia on December 3,
2006. Today, the cranes covered 106.5 miles in a flight of just over two
hours to Pike County, Georgia.

The whooping cranes are on a 1,228-mile ultralight-guided migration
from Necedah National Wildlife Refuge in central Wisconsin to
Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge along Florida's Gulf Coast.
They left Wisconsin on October 5, following four ultralight aircraft.

To date, the birds have traveled 902.9 miles. The Whooping Crane
Eastern Partnership (WCEP), an international coalition of public and
private groups, is conducting this project in an effort to reintroduce
this endangered species in eastern North America. For more information
and to follow the whooping crane's migration, visit the WCEP web site
at
www.bringbackthecranes.org.

"The State of Georgia is a key partner in this unprecedented effort
to reintroduce whooping cranes into the eastern flyway," said Sam
Hamilton, Southeast Regional Director for the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service, a WCEP founding partner. "We are grateful for the efforts of
the Georgia Department of Natural Resources and our other state
colleagues in helping to make this project a success."

Background

There are now 66 migratory whooping cranes in the wild in eastern North
America - including the first whooping crane chicks to hatch in the wild
in Wisconsin in more than a century.

The two wild whooping crane chicks hatched on June 22 at the Necedah
National Wildlife Refuge. The wild-hatched crane chicks stuck close to
their parents at Necedah NWR for much of the summer until fledging, or
gaining their flight feathers, in early September. One of the chicks
stayed behind when its parents and sibling moved from their territory,
and as of today that chick has not been located. The other chick, a
female, was leg-banded so that she can be tracked by WCEP biologists.

The ultralight-led Class of 2006 includes the first crane hatched from
the reintroduced eastern migratory whooping crane population. Hatched on
May 7 at the U.S. Geological Survey's Patuxent Wildlife Research
Center in Laurel, Md., Crane 2-06's parents are whooping cranes 13 (a
male) and 18 (a female) from the ultralight-led crane Class of 2002. In
addition to the 18 birds being led south by ultralights, biologists from
the International Crane Foundation and the U.S. Fish and Wildlife
Service reared four whooping cranes at Necedah NWR that were released in
the company of older cranes in hopes that the young birds learn the
migration route, part of WCEP's "Direct Autumn Release" program,
which supplements the successful ultralight migrations.

In 2001, project partner Operation Migration's pilots led the first
whooping crane chicks, conditioned to follow their ultralight
surrogates, south from Necedah NWR to Chassahowitzka NWR. Each
subsequent year, WCEP biologists and pilots have conditioned and guided
additional groups of juvenile cranes to Chassahowitzka.

The whooping crane chicks that take part in the reintroduction project
are hatched at the Patuxent Wildlife Research Center in Maryland. There,
the young cranes are introduced to ultralight aircraft and raised in
isolation from humans. To ensure the impressionable cranes remain wild,
project biologists and pilots adhere to a strict no-talking rule,
broadcast recorded crane calls and wear costumes designed to mask the
human form whenever they are around the cranes.

New classes of cranes are brought to Necedah NWR each June to begin a
summer of conditioning behind the ultralights to prepare them for their
fall migration. Pilots lead the birds on gradually longer training
flights at the refuge throughout the summer until the young cranes are
deemed ready to follow the aircraft along the migration route.

Most graduated classes of whooping cranes spend the summer in central
Wisconsin, where they use areas on or near the Necedah National Wildlife
Refuge, as well as various state and private lands. Reintroduced
whooping cranes have also spent time in Minnesota, Iowa, Illinois,
Michigan and other states.

Project staff from the International Crane Foundation and the Service
track and monitor southbound cranes in an effort to learn as much as
possible about their unassisted migrations and the habitat choices they
make along the way. The birds are monitored during the winter in Florida
and tracked as they make their way north in the spring. ICF and Service
biologists, along with Wisconsin DNR biologists, continue to monitor the
birds while they are in their summer locations.

Whooping cranes were on the verge of extinction in the 1940s. Today,
there are only about 500 birds in existence, 350 of them in the wild.
Aside from the 66 Wisconsin-Florida birds, the only other migrating
population of whooping cranes nests at the Wood Buffalo National Park in
the Northwest Territories of Canada and winters at the Aransas National
Wildlife Refuge on the Texas Gulf Coast.

A non-migrating flock of approximately 55 birds lives year-round in
central Florida. The remaining 150 whooping cranes are in captivity in
zoos and breeding facilities around North America.

Whooping cranes, named for their loud and penetrating unison calls,
live and breed in wetland areas, where they feed on crabs, clams, frogs
and aquatic plants. They are distinctive animals, standing five feet
tall, with white bodies, black wing tips and red crowns on their heads.

WCEP asks anyone who encounters a whooping crane in the wild to please
give them the respect and distance they need. Do not approach birds on
foot within 600 feet; try to remain in your vehicle; do not approach in
a vehicle within 600 feet or, if on a public road, within 300 feet.
Also, please remain concealed and do not speak loudly enough that the
birds can hear you. Finally, do not trespass on private property in an
attempt to view whooping cranes.

Whooping Crane Eastern Partnership founding members are the
International Crane Foundation, Operation Migration Inc., Wisconsin
Department of Natural Resources, U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, the
U.S. Geological Survey's Patuxent Wildlife Research Center and
National Wildlife Health Center, the National Fish and Wildlife
Foundation, the Natural Resources Foundation of Wisconsin, and the
International Whooping Crane Recovery Team.

Many other flyway states, provinces, private individuals and
conservation groups have joined forces with and support WCEP by donating
resources, funding and personnel. More than 60 percent of the
project's estimated $1.8 million annual budget comes from private
sources in the form of grants, public donations and corporate sponsors.

For more information on the project, its partners and how you can help,
visit the WCEP website at http://www.bringbackthecranes.org.

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Division of Coastal Management

Division of Coastal Management · Total News: 86 · Total Reads: 51195

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Carolina Beach Inlet (ddp)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Fill approximately 0.95 acres of Department of the Army jurisdictional wetlands (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  New Weapons Training Range (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Fortune Bay Golf Club Fined $11,000 (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  New Boat Ramp on Lake Wylie (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Class I Administrative Penalty against Waste Industries, Inc (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Topsail Island Subdivision project site (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Helmsdale at Landfall residential subdivision (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Carolina Marina proposes to replace the existing pier (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Fortune Bay Golf Club, LLC (Dawg)
· More -->

Most recent article:

Carolina Beach Inlet
by: ddp
2007-04-27 21:20:07

Carolina Beach Inlet

To all Carolina Beach Inlet users. We have no federal funding for the inlet and it is shoaled between 3 and 4. The state has agreed to pay 75% of the cost for 2 dredgings this year if the county will kick in 25%. I need everyone that can to write and or call the New Hanover county commissioners and urge them to vote for the funding. We need a dredge now so ask them to address this asap.

Here is the list of commissioners.

Bill Caster-452-1282, bcaster@nhcgov.com

Ted Davis- 763-6249, 313-0755-tdavis@nhcgov.com

Robert Greer-686-1703, 6197879-bgreer@nhcgov.com

BillKnopp, 431-7120, bknopp@nhcgov.com

Nancy Pritchett, 791-2827, npritchett@nhcgov.com

Please do this asap as my job as well as a lot of others depend on this inlet to stay open

Thanks,
Capt. Don Pierce
Blue Marlin Fishing Charters

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Fishing The Carolina Coast

Fishing The Carolina Coast · Total News: 245 · Total Reads: 181782

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Funding agreement allows continued recreational water quality monitoring (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Commercial Fishermen Needed to Remove Marine Debris (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Here come catch shares: How NOAA and the Environmental Defense (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Congressman Walter Jones Questions NOAA Catch Share Policy (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  2010 Flat Bottom Girls Flounder Tournament (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NOAA affirms catch share push in face of industry fire (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  THE MFC ADVISOR (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Fishing Rights Alliance (FRA) today filed a lawsuit to stop Amendment 16 (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Sea Creature wins 51st Big Rock (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  King Mackerel Tournament to benefit Lower Cape Fear Hospice & LifeCareCenter (Coolican)
· More -->

Most recent article:

Funding agreement allows continued recreational water quality monitoring
by: Capt_Dave
2014-04-09 09:58:12

Funding agreement allows continued recreational water quality monitoring

RALEIGH – The state will be able to continue water quality testing at 38 coastal swimming sites that had been on the chopping block due to cuts in federal funding.

The Albemarle-Pamlico National Estuary Partnership, or APNEP, provided a $20,000 grant to the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries to continue monitoring the sites in northeastern North Carolina.

“This is a great example of the inter-divisional partnerships and coordination being instituted within the Department of Environment and Natural Resources,” said Louis Daniel, director of the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries, or DMF. “This funding is a huge help to a program that is very important to our coastal region and our many constituents.”

Bill Crowell, director of APNEP, echoed Daniel’s sentiments.

“This program is vital to public health along our coasts. In lean financial times, we’re pleased that our advisory board can provide support to DMF in these critical efforts.”

The 38 swimming sites are along the Neuse River, The Pamlico River, Pantego Creek near Belhaven, Swan Quarter Bay in Hyde County, Vandemere Creek in Pamlico County, and tributaries of the Albemarle Sound. More than half of the 38 sites are at public beaches or near popular summer camps including Camp Vandemere, Camp Don Lee, Camp Hardee, Camp Caroline, Camp Seafarer and Camp Seagull.

The division receives federal assistance from the Environmental Protection Agency to implement the Recreational Water Quality Program. Due to budget reductions that were part of the federal government sequestration, the program had planned to suspend the monitoring of 41 sampling sites until funding was restored.

Afterward, Camp Lejeune Marine Corps Base agreed to take over testing of two sites on the New River, the swimming beach at Southwest Creek and at the mouth of Northeast Creek.

Sites monitored through the division’s Recreational Water Quality Program are tested for high bacterial concentrations in coastal recreational waters to protect public health. The program notifies the public when bacteria levels exceed standards for safe bodily contact. Swimming in polluted waters can cause gastrointestinal distress, diarrhea, vomiting, skin rashes and infections.

Sites are tested during the swimming season that runs from April 1 to Oct. 31. All ocean beaches and high-use sound-side beaches are tested weekly from April through September; lower-use beaches are tested twice a month.

In addition to protecting public health, the program provides a long-term source of data to study water quality trends in North Carolina’s sounds. Many of these sites have been regularly monitored since 1997.

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Flounder News

Flounder News · Total News: 10 · Total Reads: 15114

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Flounder limits get second look (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  FLOUNDER (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  FLOUNDER - INTERNAL WATERS (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  FLOUNDER - COMMERCIAL FISHING OPERATIONS - ATLANTIC OCEAN (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  FLOUNDER - COMMERCIAL FISHING OPERATIONS - ATLANTIC OCEAN (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  FLOUNDER - COMMERCIAL FISHING OPERATIONS - ATLANTIC OCEAN (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  RE: FLOUNDER - COMMERCIAL FISHING OPERATIONS - ATLANTIC OCEAN (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  RE: FLOUNDER - INTERNAL WATERS (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  RE: FLOUNDER - COMMERCIAL FISHING OPERATIONS - ATLANTIC OCEAN (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  FLOUNDER - INTERNAL WATERS PROCLAMATION (Dawg)
· More -->

Most recent article:

Flounder limits get second look
by: Dawg
2004-11-06 19:43:44

Admin Note: I don't usually run print stories because of Copyright issues but after reading this I think it so important....I HAD to run it......I will remove it IF required!

Flounder limits get second look
November 05, 2004
PATRICIA SMITH
DAILY NEWS STAFF

MOREHEAD CITY - State fisheries authorities will reconsider a plan to increase the commercial flounder size limit from 13 to 14 inches in inshore waters in a special session Nov. 15.

Marine Fisheries Commission member B.J. Copeland said he plans to put forth a motion to include the size limit increase and a Dec. 1 to Dec. 31 commercial season closure in a final draft of a Southern Flounder Fishery Management Plan.

"That's the best we can do, I think," Copeland said.

In an attempt to minimize impacts on commercial fishermen, Copeland led the board in an Oct. 13 decision to omit the size limit increase from the document.

In a 5-4 vote, the commission chose to rely on a Dec. 1 through March 31 commercial and recreational season closure, along with stricter net mesh size requirements, an eight-fish recreational bag limit and other restrictions, to reduce flounder catches enough to allow the over-fished populations to recover.

"It wasn't enough,' Copeland said.

Biologists said the state needs to reduce harvests of southern flounder by about 24 percent in order to achieve recovery of the species within 10 years, as required by law. But an analysis of what the commission approved showed it would result in about a 12 percent to 16 percent catch reduction, depending on how the gear restrictions were applied, said Joe Grist, stock assessment scientist with the state Division of Marine Fisheries.

That was higher than those who voted against the measure expected, said commission chairman Jimmy Johnson.

"Most folks thought it would probably be less than 12," Johnson said.

Grist said the division was still trying to determine what catch reduction would result from the motion Copeland plans to bring at the special meeting. That motion will also include the gear restrictions and the recreational bag limit approved earlier, Copeland said.

Southern flounder is the species most often caught in the rivers and sounds of North Carolina. It is one of the most economically important finfish to commercial fisherman and the species most targeted by recreational fishermen.

The commission took to public hearing a draft plan calling for a 30-percent reduction of southern flounder harvests after biologists said that no less of a catch reduction would achieve recovery of the fishery in 10 years.

That draft plan proposed increasing the commercial size limit from 13 to 14 inches with a Nov. 8 to Dec. 31 season closure. The proposal brought an outcry from the gill and pound net fisheries.

Following the public hearings, division biologists used an updated computer program and found a 24-percent reduction in commercial harvest might achieve the goal. The division then revised its recommendation to endorse a 14-inch commercial size limit with closure from Nov. 25 through Dec. 31. An advisory committee went with the size limit increase and a Nov. 8 through Dec. 31 season closure for both recreational and commercial fishermen.

A re-evaluation of the assessments has since found that the actual harvest reduction from the division recommended management strategy could be 4 percent to 6 percent lower than thought, said division Director Preston Pate. But biologists still believe the measures will rebuild the fish stocks as required by law, though there is a higher risk that they will not work, he said.

"We'll still stick with our recommendation," Pate said.

The special meeting will begin at 1 p.m. Nov. 15 in the upstairs meeting rooms at the Crystal Coast Civic Center in Morehead City.

Contact Patricia Smith by calling (252) 808-2275.

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FPT Site News

FPT Site News · Total News: 56 · Total Reads: 45339

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Greenville Hands On Saltwater Fishing School (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Greensboro Boating and Fishing Expo (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Loss of Buoy 41036 (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Loss of Buoy 41036 (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  House Natural Resources Committee pushing partial rewrite of the Magnuson-Steven (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Military Appreciation Day (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  FREE Fish Finding from Space THIS Friday (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  RECREATIONAL CATCH SHARE WORKSHOP IN WYOMING 10/21-10/22 (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Local fishermen to attend rally in support of industry (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  FISHERMEN TO MARCH ON WASHINGTON (Capt_Dave)
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Most recent article:

Greenville Hands On Saltwater Fishing School
by: Capt_Dave
2014-02-25 12:34:36

Greenville “Hands On” Saltwater Fishing School


Fisherman’s Post Newspaper will be hosting its annual full-day Greenville “Hands On” Saltwater Fishing School on Saturday, March 15, in the Overton's warehouse (directly behind their retail showroom).
This year the Fisherman’s Post Greenville “Hands On” Saltwater Fishing School is staffed by more than 14 local captains who will share their experience and insights on river, inshore, surf, nearshore, offshore, and blue water fishing. They’ll cover a range of topics that includes techniques, equipment, strategy, locations, terminal tackle, electronics, bait, etc.

The captains selected for the Greenville Saltwater Fishing School are not only specialists in their field, but they also have the personality and communication skills to be strong and effective educators.

There will be main seminars and several hands-on stations going on concurrently all day long, so you will always be able to find a session that interests you.

The main seminars will have three captains working together to thoroughly cover their particular subject material, as well as give their different perspectives on what works for them.

The hands-on stations are smaller, with participants often tying and making the rigs themselves. You learn the rigs. You make the rigs. You keep the rigs.

In addition to the full day of learning and interacting with our captains, the $90 price includes a Fish School t-shirt, breakfast, snacks, drinks, a BBQ/chicken lunch, rigging materials, a goodie bag, door prizes, and a chance to win a citation red drum trip as well as a Costa Rica fishing adventure or an Argentinian duck hunting trip.

For more information on the Greenville Schools(or to reserve your seat--space is limited), you can go to www.fishermanspost.com and click on the “Fishing Schools” link. You can also call (910) 452-6378 or email school@fishermanspost.com.

 

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Green Peace

Green Peace · Total News: 18 · Total Reads: 18283

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Greenpeace launches first public pirate fishing vessel âà(Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Wake-up call for the world - Whales protection goes beyond IWC (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Ten football pitches worth of ocean floor devastated every four seconds (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Greenpeace stops pirate fishing vessels in European port (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Top 10 Congressional Mis-Leaders (hoo_hunter)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Hurricane Katrina, one of the largest and strongest storms on record (hoo_hunter)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  A Big Fight for a Small Fish (hoo_hunter)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Icelandic 2005 bogus scientific hunt comes to an end (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Widespread destruction and fisheries mismanagement in the Northwest Atlantic (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Greenpeace discovers pirate fisher companies fishing in international waters (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

Greenpeace launches first public pirate fishing vessel âÃÂ
by: Dawg
2007-03-11 07:57:00

Greenpeace launches first public pirate fishing vessel ‘list of shame’

Rome, Italy, 7 March 2007 - Greenpeace today launched a first global
database of blacklisted, illegal fishing vessels, in a bid to tackle the
huge problem of illegal, unregulated and unreported (IUU) fishing, a $9
billion rogue industry which is having a devastating effect on fish
stocks and biodiversity in some of the most ecologically important areas
of the world’s oceans.

The Greenpeace database (http://oceans.greenpeace.org/blacklist), which
was launched at the meeting of the committee on Fisheries of the Food
and Agriculture Organisations (FAO) in Rome, aims to publicly identify
vessels which are involved in so-called ‘pirate fishing’, to expose the
lack of action by the authorities to prevent the illegal trade.

Today, Greenpeace also released a report (2) showing that the attempts
at voluntary measures to curb pirate fishing by governments have had
little effect on the levels of illegal fishing in some of the poorest
and most desperate areas of action in the world, particularly the west
coast of Africa.

"The fact that Greenpeace has to publish a global database of
blacklisted illegal fishing vessels demonstrates clearly just how little
concrete action states have taken to stop this pillage of our oceans,"
Sari Tolvanen of Greenpeace International. "What’s needed now is an
official body to take charge of the policing of the worlds’ oceans and
make publicly available the information of both illegitimate and
unlicensed fishing vessels. Until this happens, we have little hope of
stopping the devastation which pirate fishing brings."

The Greenpeace report shows that six years after the member countries of
the FAO approved an International Plan of Action to curb illegal
fishing, the problem is very far from being solved. It includes evidence
gathered last year when the Greenpeace ship Esperanza, spent two months
documenting the activities of foreign fleets off the coast of Guinea
Conakry (3). That investigation discovered that almost half of the 92
fishing vessels encountered in Guinea’s waters were fishing illegally,
or linked to illegal fishing activities. It has been estimated that
sub-Saharan Africa loses around $1 billion a year due to the activities
of such illegal trawling fleets.

"The measures needed to stamp out pirate fishing are well known. Action
is required at all levels of the chain of custody, from the net in the
water to the fish on the shelves of supermarkets", said Sebastian
Losada, Greenpeace Oceans campaigner. "International cooperation,
binding laws on port control, as well as a global register of fishing
vessels and adequate sanctions are among the tools that Governments need
to put in place to act against the pirate fleets that are literally
stealing the food of some of the poorest people in the world and
destroying our marine ecosystems".

Greenpeace campaigners attending the United Nations fisheries meeting in
Rome demanded that governments must translate the existing voluntary
frameworks and international initiatives into hard law. The
international environmental organisation also demanded that the special
requirements of developing countries in fighting illegal fishing be
taken into account.

Contacts

Sebastian Losada, Greenpeace Spain Oceans Campaigner, +34 626998254
Sari Tolvanen, Greenpeace International Oceans Campaigner, in Rome.
+31655125480

(1) http://oceans.greenpeace.org/blacklist
(2) "Witnessing the plunder 2006. How illegal fish from West African
waters finds its way to the EU ports and markets", available at
www.greenpeace.org
(3) The Esperanza documented pirate fishing in West Africa as part of
the Defending Our Oceans expedition, a 15-month expedition, the biggest
the organisation has ever undertaken, to show the threats to the oceans
and outline solutions to the oceans environmental crises.
http://blacklist.greenpeace.org/

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IGFA

IGFA · Total News: 10 · Total Reads: 20650

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Dunaways to be honored with IGFA Lifetime Achievement Awards (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  First IGFA Certified Observer training class of 2006 at Miami Boat Show, Feb. 19 (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  New Pending World Records (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Texas girl catches 184 pound wahoo in Mexico; in line for three IGFA world recor (hoo_hunter)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  CATCH AS BIG AS A COW (hoo_hunter)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Exceptional Black Drum caught in Shallote River (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  IGFA actively represented at World Recreational Fishing Conference Fourth event (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  IGFA Fishing Hall Of Fame To Enshrine Five Men (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  IGFA HOT NEWS - February 2005 (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  The Second Annual IGFA World Record Achievement Awards Celebration (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

Dunaways to be honored with IGFA Lifetime Achievement Awards
by: Dawg
2006-03-27 05:05:18

Dunaways to be honored with IGFA Lifetime Achievement Awards

Celebration also marks 2005 records by men, women, juniors and builders

DANIA BEACH, Fla. --- Two outstanding anglers will be honored with the International Game Fish Association’s Lifetime Achievement Award at the IGFA’s Third Annual World Record Achievement Awards Celebration. The event will take place at the Fishing Hall of Fame & Museum in Dania Beach, Florida, Saturday evening, March 18th.

The event recognizes the 2005 records by men, women, juniors, professional captains and tackle manufacturers for the most world records recently published in the IGFA’s 2006 World Record Game Fishes annual. Jerry Dunaway and Deborah Maddux Dunaway of Houston, Texas, highlight this year’s ceremony for their astonishing billfish records and will receive the IGFA’s Lifetime Achievement Awards. Jerry began offshore fishing in 1969 and has caught an unbelievable 203 Atlantic blue marlin, 36 Pacific blue marlin, 96 black marlin, 10 swordfish, as well as untold numbers of sailfish, white marlin and striped marlin. His 16 IGFA billfish records are more than any man in history, and he was also the first man to have IGFA records for Atlantic blue marlin on 4 and 8 lb lines.

Deborah Dunaway began fishing in 1985 and has fished in 18 countries, catching an unprecedented 23 IGFA billfish records—more than any angler in history. Deborah is the only angler to have held IGFA records for all nine species of billfish. In 1993 she also became the only person to hold current records in all nine species at the same time. She is also one of the top 5 female record holders of all time. The heaviest catches will be rewarded, as will the freshwater and saltwater captains who have led their anglers to other outstanding achievements throughout the year. The IGFA will also award tackle manufacturers whose products have captured the most world records in 2005.

The proceeds from this prestigious event will continue to support the IGFA’s many conservation initiatives. Some of these programs include; recreational fisheries representation on national and international fisheries management panels, game fish research and support of the IGFA Certified Observer Program.

For reservations and tickets ($75) for the ceremony please call Ms. Lesley Arico at 954-924-4222 or via email LArico@igfa.org.

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International Big Fish Network, Inc.

International Big Fish Network, Inc. · Total News: 37 · Total Reads: 28860

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Boat Breakdown and Search Provides Real-Life Tournament Drama (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  IBFN Announces 2006 Edition of Top Tournaments Report (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Circle Hook Prize Scores High at Big Rock and Pirate's Cove (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Katrina Triggers Fishery Disaster Declaration (hoo_hunter)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Batten Down the Hatches (hoo_hunter)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Captain Backs it in... 80 miles! (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Tell the Fisheries Service Your Solution To Management! (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Florida Swordfishing Surges (hoo_hunter)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Boy Survives Bump From Killer Whale (hoo_hunter)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Anglers Help With Tagging Sharks (hoo_hunter)
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Most recent article:

Boat Breakdown and Search Provides Real-Life Tournament Drama
by: Dawg
2005-11-18 03:35:01

Boat Breakdown and Search Provides Real-Life Tournament Drama

CABO SAN LUCAS, BCS -- A photo taken from the start boat shows the Joana headed past Cabo's famous arch, ready to take part in the Los Cabos Tuna Jackpot. Little did the anglers -- Wayne Harmond, Brian Taylor, Robert Taylor and Larry Voldenc -- know it wasn't a tuna that would make them a big part of the seventh annual event.

On the afternoon of the first day of fishing, the captain of the Joana reported mechanical problems to Mike Packard, who was once again the staff member in charge of the radio as tournament control. Packard said the initial reports were confused, with one report indicating the boat would be able to make it in on the remaining engine.

By the time it was determined the boat was a single engine vessel and was adrift, all tournament boats had returned and it was night. Packard would remain in radio contact all night and the next day would notify competitors to keep an eye out for the Joana.

Compounding the situation was the fact the Joana carried no functioning navigational devices and could not report a position. A container ship reported it had passed the vessel the first night and provided coordinates, but when the Mexican Navy dispatched a launch and a helicopter to the numbers, the boat was nowhere in sight. Instead they found a panga full of drugs.

Meantime, Packard and other tournament boats kept up radio contact and encouragement, while at least one boat decided to actively search for the Joana. Chris Badsey's 45-foot Rampage Reelaxe had been plagued by boat problems before and during the tournament and he and his team, two-time money winners Steve and Dave Brackmann, were not in any of the daily jackpots. The line at the fuel dock early the second day meant they could only get half tanks of fuel and got a late start, but the fast vessel was soon leading the pack towards the Finger Bank.

"On the way up we heard the mayday call at 9:15 a.m. looking for the missing Mexican boat Joana with 6 people onboard" Badsey told WON. "I spoke with the guys and we made a decision to assist with the search and rescue immediately as I was in this same situation a year earlier without rescue for 36 hours at sea when the Mexican Navy never came to rescue us. Friends from California flying down had to charter a boat (and) run out to our last known coordinates, as all electronics were dead and we had no radio unlike Joana who did."

Badsey said he got an approximation of the Joana's position when he had a good radio signal and the Bottom Line, which was 88 nautical miles away, also had a strong signal. Badsey also noted the owner of the tournament boat Trauma sent out his private G5 plane to search.

Meanwhile Tuna Jackpot officials continued to press the Mexican Navy to search and the helicopter refueled and headed back out. Neither aircraft located the Joana. To make matters worse, Harmond, a diabetic, reported he was down to his last dose of medicine.

The Bottom Line had a fish aboard and requested that tournament officials allow them to search first and weigh after the 6 p.m. deadline. They were informed the rules of the tournament would be kept in place.

Low on fuel by 6 p.m., the Reelaxe turned back for the dock at troll speed, arriving at midnight. In the meantime, tournament officials and competitors had kept in contact with the Joana. Much effort was also put forth contacting both Mexican and U.S. Coast Guard officials.

Tournament director said the result was the Mexican Navy waived territorial jurisdiction and the Coast Guard launched rescue efforts that night, including a C-130 and a U.S. Navy vessel. One of the first things the Coast Guard did was issue a notice to mariners that included a grid that was the best estimate of the Joana's location.

Badsey decided to head back out and allowed Packard to come aboard the Reelaxe for the search effort.

"The Natural Stone and the Reelaxe were the only two boats that headed out," noted Packard. "Both captains felt this was something they had to do."

Packard said Badsey wasted no time getting to where he felt the Joana was located.

"About 12:35 a.m. we left the fuel dock, broke the lights of the marina and by the time we hit the end of Cape Rock we were doing 30 to 35 knots," said Packard. Packard said that despite heavy seas, the throttles weren't pulled back until the Joana was found.

"About 1:30 or 1:40 the navigator of the cruise ship Seven Seas had a conversation going with Joana and believed they had a visual on the vessel at that time," said Packard. "About 2 in the morning they confirmed that with us and about 2:15 the cruise ship came alongside the Joana. They put a tender in the water with supplies and a doctor for the diabetic aboard. It was about 4:15 when Reelaxe finally made contact with Joana."

With 6 to 8-foot seas still running, it was decided not to transfer the passengers and Reelaxe began to tow Joana. Then Natural Stone arrived and took over the tow duties and the 4 anglers transferred to Reelaxe.

"Chris Badsey decided he wanted to have brunch in Cabo," noted Packard. "We had been running 3 1/2 to 4 knots under tow, but we hammered the throttles down and proceeded to head back to Cabo at about 20 knots. We got in shortly before 2 p.m. to a very happy, proud welcome at N Dock with a lot of happy family members waiting.

"Thank God for once things turned out right."

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Marine Fish Conservation Network

Marine Fish Conservation Network · Total News: 19 · Total Reads: 17435

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Sharks in State Waters Need Your Support (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NMFS Begins Rulemaking Process for Reauthorized Magnuson-Stevens Act (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Standardized Bycatch Reporting Methodology Amendment moves one step closer to co (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Magnuson-Stevens Act Reauthorized! (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Congress Must Step In to Stop Overfishing (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Mismanagement of U.S. Fisheries Detailed in New Report (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Press Statement from Lee Crockett, executive director of the Marine Fish Conserv (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Feds Make Little Progress Increasing the Number of Healthy Fish (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Habitat is Where the Heart Is (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Federal Agency Fully Withdraws Proposal to Allow Overfishing (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

Sharks in State Waters Need Your Support
by: Capt_Dave
2008-03-26 04:25:43

Sharks in State Waters Need Your Support

Millions of sharks are killed worldwide each year in fisheries, and the lucrative global trade in shark fins is driving the extermination of sharks in many parts of the world. In U.S. territorial waters, federal regulations prohibit the practice of shark finning and establish limits on shark catches to foster the recovery of overfished species. In coastal waters under the states' jurisdiction, however, the rules often do not achieve federal standards of conservation and undermine efforts to conserve sharks.

Now, for the first time, the Atlantic states are proposing an interstate fishery management plan (FMP) to coordinate shark fishery management in coastal waters. A key goal of the draft FMP is to achieve parity with federal laws and standards, eliminating confusion and closing loopholes that allow unsustainable practices to continue. Among the measures under consideration is a proposal to protect the nursery areas in coastal waters in order to give shark populations a chance to recover. Please click here to send a letter to the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission to show your support of protecting coastal sharks.

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Menhaden

Menhaden · Total News:· Total Reads: 1368

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Save Our Pogies Update (hoo_hunter)

Most recent article:

Save Our Pogies Update
by: hoo_hunter
2005-09-08 07:26:07


STOP COMMERCIAL MENHADEN NETTING

SAVE OUR POGIES; where we're at - 09/06/2005

Finally, we are at a point where we can openly discuss what we have been "trying" to do with our SAVE OUR POGIES  effort and where we need to go forward from here. Basically, here is the story.

At our failed Legislative hearing, we found that our elected officials don't choose to listen to their constutients, but rather listen to powerful lobbyist. After the hearing, I saw Jules Wheatley, owner of Beaufort Fisheries, back slapping and smoking cigars with Rufus Edmisten, former State Secretary of State. Rufus, coincidently, is an old friend of mine back when he was Sec of State. We spoke, he introduced me to Wheatley, and not until that moment did I know that Rufus was the lobbyist who was representing Omega Proteins and Beaufort Fisheries. I contacted Rufus shortly thereafter and expressed to him that SOP wasn't going to go away, that we were all business people who were well versed in problem solving, and that if his clients didn't deal with our concerns in Brunswick and New Hanover counties, that their problem could spread statewide. From that conversation began a series of discussions between us and Representative Bonner Stiller. The end result was that Omega agreed to enter into an agreement that they would not come to our waters. At that point we were encouraged that we would have a solution to the issue, however Jules Wheatley at Beaufort Fisheries refused to sign the agreement. You may remember at the Legislative hearing when asked how many menhaden does he attempt to catch and his reponse was "all of them". His unwillingness to go along with Omega put an exclamation point on his earlier comment.

In the meantime Rep Stiller had kept our bill alive and he attempted to reserect it by turning it into a "Study Bill" which would have used the guidlines in the Dare County bill which restrited menhaden netting in Dare County, as the basis for study. The intent was to keep the pressure on Beaufort in hopes they would sign the agreement with Omega. The bill passed the House, however the Senate adjourned without voting on it, therefore the bill died.

So, what does all this mean? Omega agreed not to come into our waters. Beaufort does not agree. Not a solution, but a beginning. In the meantime I have heard that Beaufort has sold their property therefore they may not be an issue. Haven't confirmed that yet.

What do we do now? There is another path to follow which is to encourage the Director of Marine Fisheries, Preston Pate to declare by proclamation that our area of the State is closed to menhaden trawling. He has that power and can use it if he so chooses. Our issue is localized depletion which clearly occurs as we all know. Pate's position is the mass of menahden are not over fished and therefore there is no problem. As relates to the entire US coastline he may be right, however North Carolina and Virginia are the only 2 states that allow netting, so obviously, to look at the entire population when only fish located in 2 states are being targeted is ridiculious. We need to pound on Mr. Pate to be concerned with his state's citizens, and not an out of state company. We need to contact him via email at Preston.Pate@ncmail.ent or tele # 252-726-7021.

In the meantime, I think we should establish a spotter network, and if one of the pogy boats leaves Morehead or is seen coming down the coast, we need to use the various web sites to sound the alert. Where these boats stop to net apparently will be an excellent place for sportfishermen to fish as we all know the predador fish will be where the bait is at, therefore if a large group of fishermen choose to fish at the exact spot where the pogy boats attempt to do their netting; well maybe Mr. Pate will recognize there is a "user conflict" which is one of the justifications he can use to close an area by proclamation.

That's the story, everyone's help has been greatly appreciated, and if a solution doesn't occur before the next Legislative session, we'll start over.

Thanks again. Rube McMullan 

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Menhaden Matter

Menhaden Matter · Total News:· Total Reads: 7596

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  On the May 10th Decision by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission to P (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Governor Ehrlich to Receive "The Sportsman's Friend of the Year" Award (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  ASMFC Takes First Step Toward Cap! (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Critical Decision on Deck for the Chesapeake (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Critical Decision on Deck for the Chesapeake (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  The Most Important Fish in the Sea (Dawg)

Most recent article:

On the May 10th Decision by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission to P
by: Dawg
2006-05-12 07:17:51

On the May 10th Decision by the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission to Postpone Action Finding Virginia Out of Compliance for Not Capping Menhaden Harvests

The following is a statement from Menhaden Matter - an alliance of recreational anglers and environmentalists dedicated to protecting the ecological role of menhaden and the Chesapeake Bay - regarding the ASMFC decision to delay moving forward to initiate action against the Commonwealth of Virginia for failing to implement a limit on the menhaden harvest in the Chesapeake Bay.

"We are encouraged that Governor Kaine has signaled his interest in bringing Virginia into compliance with the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission decision to cap the industrial harvest of menhaden at current levels in the Chesapeake Bay while more research can be conducted. The Governor’s willingness to consider a cap represents recognition of the import role that 60 years of interstate cooperation have played in protecting Virginia’s marine resources, and the value that a healthy Chesapeake Bay brings to the state’s economy and quality of life. We hope that the one company that operates the East Coast’s last menhaden reduction fishery - Omega Protein - and its friends in the Virginia General Assembly will support any efforts to implement an important conservation measure that will result in no job loss for Virginians. However, if Virginia does not implement the cap by the July 1st deadline, it is essential that the ASMFC move quickly to take appropriate action so that the catch limit will be effective for the 2006 fishing season."

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Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council

Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council · Total News: 39 · Total Reads: 30527

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Hatteras North - Recreational Black Sea Bass Closure Effective November 1, 2012 (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Mid-Atlantic Council to Host Two-Part Public Listening Session on August 14 (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council's April 2012 meeting (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Atlantic States Schedule Hearings on Atlantic Menhaden Draft Addendum V (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council Meeting January 16, 2008 (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Mid-Atlantic Fishery Management Council Public Meetings December 10-14, 2007 (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  ASMFC Approves 2008 TALs for Summer Flounder, Scup, Black Sea Bass, and Bluefish (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Mid-Atlantic Council and its Committees to Meet; May 2-4 in Virginia Beach, VA (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Council Meeting in Virginia Beach, VA: May 2-4, 2006 (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Summer Flounder, Scup, and Black Sea Bass Amendment 15 (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

Hatteras North - Recreational Black Sea Bass Closure Effective November 1, 2012
by: Capt_Dave
2012-10-25 08:52:15

Hatteras North - Recreational Black Sea Bass Closure Effective November 1, 2012

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) announced yesterday that the recreational black sea bass fishery will close on November 1, 2012. The fishery will remain closed to recreational fishermen in federal waters (3-200 miles from shore) through the end of the year.

The early closure was prompted last week by the release of recreational catch data that indicated the recreational harvest limit for black sea bass had been exceeded. In addition to a shortened season, the recreational fishery will face reduced catch limits in 2013 or 2014 to account for the overage. This is the first season in which the recreational black sea bass fishery will have to pay back a harvest overage.

Although the most recent assessment update for black sea bass indicated that the stock was not overfished and that overfishing was not occurring, the fishery continues to present substantial management challenges due to multiple issues with scientific uncertainty.

“The Council’s management of black sea bass has been constrained by scientific uncertainty in the assessment and quota-setting process. The apparent performance and health of the fishery raises important scientific and management issues that need to be resolved,” said Council Chairman Rick Robins. “We understand that the closure will have serious implications for the recreational fishing community and are committed to working closely with the Northeast Fisheries Science Center, the NMFS regional office, the Council's Scientific and Statistical Committee (SSC), and the ASMFC to address the scientific and management issues in the black sea bass fishery as quickly as possible.”

The closure, which applies to both private anglers and party/charter vessels, prohibits fishing for or possessing black sea bass in Federal waters for the remainder of 2012. The Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission is expected to discuss the harvest of black sea bass in state waters at its annual meeting this week.

Read the full announcement from NOAA Fisheries here:

http://www.nero.noaa.gov/nr/doc/12/12bsbclosurerecphl.pdf

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National Coalition for Marine Conservati

National Coalition for Marine Conservati · Total News: 90 · Total Reads: 53513

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  LONGLINE AREA CLOSURES US Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  COMMENT PERIOD EXTENDED (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  CIRCLE HOOK RULE WILL TAKE EFFECT IN 2008 (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  REVISED OFFSHORE AQUACULTURE BILL INTRODUCED IN CONGRESS (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  SAY NO TO LONGLINING IN THE CLOSED AREAS (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  TELL NMFS NOT TO SUSPEND CIRCLE HOOK RULE (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NCMC TESTIFIES ON SETTING CATCH LIMITS IN AN ECOSYSTEMS CONTEXT (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  ATLANTIC MARLIN STOCKS SHOW IMPROVEMENT (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  INTERSTATE COMMISSION MOVES FORWARD WITH VIRGINIA'S PROPOSAL FOR MENHADEN CAP (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Interstate Commission Must Approve the Plan (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

LONGLINE AREA CLOSURES US Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico
by: Dawg
2008-01-10 08:29:28

LONGLINE AREA CLOSURES US Atlantic and Gulf of Mexico

Longline bycatch reduction according to most recent data by NOAA Fisheries*

NOAA Fisheries (formerly NMFS), in settling NCMC's lawsuit over swordfish, billfish and shark bycatch in the longline fisheries (NCMC vs. Secretary of Commerce), closed 133,000 square miles of coastal waters off the southeast U.S. coast in August 2000 (see closed areas, in green, in map below). The closures went into effect in March 2001.

Longlines are a type of commercial fishing gear used to target swordfish and tuna but which also take a large bycatch of undersized fish and non-target species that are discarded dead at sea. Species discarded by longline gear include blue and white marlin, sailfish, endangered sea turtles, birds, marine mammals and undersize swordfish. While progress is being made in modifying longline gear to minimize interactions with seabirds and turtles, the only known method of dealing with the bycatch of protected or prohibited fish is to get the gear out of the water, where and when it is doing the most damage.

The agency's estimates of bycatch reduction after the 2003 fishing season (combined results for 2001-2003*) as compared to the average bycatch during 1997-1999 (pre-closures) are:

Juvenile swordfish
-39.5%
White marlin
-47.5%
Blue marlin
-50.3%
Sailfish
-74.6%
Dolphin
-47.2%
Large coastal sharks
-27.9%
Pelagic sharks
-55.9%

The reductions in bycatch observed after three full years of the closures are substantial and the NCMC is extremely encouraged by these initial reports. If correct, they would represent a significant achievement in reducing longline bycatch through the use of discreet closures. Even so, we remain concerned that under-reporting of bycatch (estimates are based on vessel logbooks augmented by limited observer coverage) and future shifts in longline effort, including increasing effort as the swordfish population recovers from years of overfishing, may impact closure effectiveness. It's especially important, therefore, that NOAA Fisheries continue to improve its ability to monitor the longline fleet and to obtain accurate catch information. Our confidence in the benefits of the closures will increase with time, as we collect more and better data, but the initial signs are positive news for big fish in the Atlantic. The NCMC is also urging NOAA Fisheries to examine longline bycatch levels in additional areas (see areas in yellow in map above) to determine whether seasonal closures in these regions would further benefit severely overfished blue and white marlin.


*as of 2007, the 2001-2003 data is the most recent NOAA FIsheries has published.


Read more about recent attempts to open the US southeast closures.

Learn more about longline closures NCMC is promoting to
protect giant bluefin tuna.

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National Science Foundation

National Science Foundation · Total News: 12 · Total Reads: 13097

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Accelerating Loss of Ocean Species Threatens Human Well-Being (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Scientists Uncover New Clues to Limb Formation (and Loss) in Some Sea Mammals (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Swimming Robot Tests Theories About Locomotion in Existing and Extinct Animals (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Lobsters Avoid Virus by Detecting Illness in Their Own Kind (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Geologists Drill Into Fossil Magma Chamber Deep Under the Ocean (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Crew Member on Antarctic Research Vessel Missing (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Crew Member on Antarctic Research Vessel Missing (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Scientists Discover Interplay Between Genes and Viruses in Tiny Ocean Plankton (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Project Takes Fish Collection into the Digital Age (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Bering Sea Ecosystem Responding to Changes in Arctic Climate (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

Accelerating Loss of Ocean Species Threatens Human Well-Being
by: Dawg
2006-11-06 06:38:09

Accelerating Loss of Ocean Species Threatens Human Well-Being

Current trends project collapse of currently fished seafoods by 2050

An international group of ecologists and economists has shown that the loss of biodiversity is profoundly reducing the ocean's ability to produce seafood, resist diseases, filter pollutants and rebound from stresses such as overfishing and climate change. Their results are published in this week's issue of the journal Science.

The study reveals that every species lost causes a faster unraveling of the overall ecosystem. Conversely, every species recovered adds significantly to overall productivity and stability of the ecosystem and its ability to withstand stresses.

"Whether we looked at tide pools or studies over the entire world's ocean, we saw the same picture emerging," said lead author Boris Worm of Dalhousie University. "In losing species we lose the productivity and stability of entire ecosystems. I was shocked and disturbed by how consistent these trends are--beyond anything we suspected."

The 4-year analysis is the first to examine all existing data on ocean species and ecosystems, synthesizing historical, experimental, fisheries, and observational data sets to understand the importance of biodiversity at the global scale.

"The findings show the power of synthesizing data for generating a scientific basis for important natural resource decisions," said Henry Gholz, program director in the National Science Foundation's (NSF) Division of Environmental Biology, which funded the research. The synthesis was done through the NSF-funded National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis in Santa Barbara, Calif.

The results reveal global trends that mirror what scientists have observed at smaller scales, and they prove that progressive biodiversity loss not only impairs the ability of oceans to feed a growing human population, but also sabotages the stability of marine environments and their ability to recover from stresses.

While the data show that ocean ecosystems still hold great ability to rebound, the current global trend projects the collapse of all species of wild seafood that are currently fished by the year 2050 (collapse is defined as 90 percent depletion).

Collapses are also hastened by the decline in overall health of the ecosystem, because the fish rely on the clean water, prey populations and diverse habitats that are linked to higher-diversity systems.

"Unless we fundamentally change the way we manage all the oceans species together, as working ecosystems, then this century is the last century of wild seafood," said co-author Steve Palumbi of Stanford University.

The impacts of species loss go beyond declines in seafood. Human health risks emerge as depleted coastal ecosystems become vulnerable to invasive species, disease outbreaks and harmful algal blooms.

Many of the economic activities along our coasts rely on diverse systems and the healthy waters they supply. "The ocean is a great recycler," said Palumbi, "It takes sewage and recycles it into nutrients, it scrubs toxins out of the water, and it produces food and turns carbon dioxide into food and oxygen." But in order to provide these services, the ocean needs all its working parts, the millions of plant and animal species that inhabit the sea."

The study analyzed 32 controlled experiments, observational studies from 48 marine protected areas, and global catch data from the UN's Food and Agriculture Organization's database of all fish and invertebrates worldwide from 1950 to 2003. The scientists also looked at a 1000-year time series for 12 coastal regions, drawing on data from archives, fishery records, sediment cores and archeological data.

"We see an accelerating decline in coastal species over the past 1,000 years, resulting in the loss of biological filter capacity, nursery habitats, and healthy fisheries," said co-author Heike Lotze of Dalhousie University who led the historical analysis of Chesapeake Bay, San Francisco Bay, the Bay of Fundy, and the North Sea, among others.

Examination of protected areas worldwide shows that restoration of biodiversity increased productivity four-fold in terms of catch per unit effort and made ecosystems 21 percent less susceptible to environmental and human caused fluctuations on average.

"The data show us it's not too late," said Worm. "We can turn this around. But less than 1 percent of the global ocean is effectively protected right now. We won't see complete recovery in one year, but in many cases species come back more quickly than people anticipated -- in three to five to ten years. And where this has been done we see immediate economic benefits."

The buffering impact of species diversity also generates long term insurance values that must be incorporated into future economic valuation and management decisions. "Although there are short-term economic costs associated with preservation of marine biodiversity, over the long-term biodiversity conservation and economic development are complementary goals," said coauthor Ed Barbier, an economist from the University of Wyoming.

The authors conclude that restoring marine biodiversity through an ecosystem based management approach--including integrated fisheries management, pollution control, maintenance of essential habitats and creation of marine reserves--is essential to avoid serious threats to global food security, coastal water quality and ecosystem stability.

"This isn't predicted to happen, this is happening now," said co-author Nicola Beaumont, an ecological economist with the Plymouth Marine Laboratory. "If biodiversity continues to decline, the marine environment will not be able to sustain our way of life. Indeed it may not be able to sustain our lives at all."

-NSF-

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NC Conservation Network

NC Conservation Network · Total News:· Total Reads: 10507

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NC Wildlife Refuge In Danger (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Navy Persists in Threatening National Refuge With Jet Landing Field (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Mercury pollution is a threat to public health (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Stop the Slimy Bills! (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  North Carolina has a mercury problem. (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  North Carolina's Environmental Management Commission wants to know if you think (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Act Now For TOUGH lobbying & ethics reforms in NC (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Clean Water Lobby Day 2006! (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Clean Water Lobby Day 2006! (Dawg)

Most recent article:

NC Wildlife Refuge In Danger
by: Dawg
2007-04-05 07:52:53

NC Wildlife Refuge In Danger
New Public Hearing to be held in Charlotte

The U.S. Navy has proposed once again to put a jet landing field right next to the Pocosin Lakes National Wildlife Refuge in Eastern North Carolina, winter home to 100,000 swans and geese. It is also home to numerous black bears, and the country’s only population of endangered red wolves, as well as Bald Eagles and millions of other birds. The conflict between jets and birds is inevitable at this site. The recent court-ordered supplemental report reveals just how far the Navy may have to go to try to make the site work: stripping forage crops from 20,000 acres and harassing, even poisoning, birds that might interfere with the jets.

Please act now before it is too late by either: 

1) Submit your written comment online now to the U.S. Navy and NC's Congressional Delegation, click here.

-OR-

2) Attending one of the following public hearings to give your written and/or verbal comments to the U.S. Navy. Click on a city below for more details:

TONIGHT Tuesday, April 3rd-Beaufort Community College Washington, NC

Wednesday, April 4th-Vernon G. James Research and Extension Center NCSU Plymouth, NC

NEW Tuesday, April 17th-Charlotte Convention Center Ballroom A Charlotte, NC

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NC Marine Trade Wind

NC Marine Trade Wind · Total News: 15 · Total Reads: 15227

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Boating Infrastructure Grants Deadline Sept. 28 (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Update from the North Carolina Beach, Inlet & Waterway Association (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Coastal Marina Corrections Needed NOW for Boating Guide Updates (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Abandoned and Derelict Vessel and Debris Study for Coastal North Carolina (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  North Carolina's Changing Waterfronts Forum: Coastal Access and Traditional Uses (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Continued Loss of Coastal Boating Services (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  State eyes dreding financing (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NC MARTEC awarded training grant (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Disappearing working waterfronts - a problem brewing for NC (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NC Boat Builders Grow (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

Boating Infrastructure Grants Deadline Sept. 28
by: Dawg
2007-09-13 06:06:36

Boating Infrastructure Grants Deadline Sept. 28

 

The N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries is accepting proposals for the Boating Infrastructure Grant (BIG) program for federal fiscal year 2008 with a deadline for applications of September 28th.

BIG is a program of the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service that reimburses up to 75 percent of the cost of projects that provide docking and other facilities for recreational transient vessels that are at least 26 feet long. The state Division of Marine Fisheries is the liaison with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service for BIG projects in North Carolina.

The types of programs that could be funded include mooring buoys, day-docks, boat slips for transient vessels, safe harbor facilities, floating and fixed piers and breakwaters, dinghy docks, retaining walls, dockside utilities, trash collection and recycling facilities, water and telephone capabilities, navigational aids and marine fueling stations. It also may fund one-time dredging to provide access between open water and a tie-up facility.

For more information, contact Brian Cheuvront, federal aid coordinator, N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries, at (252) 808-8015 or (800) 682-2632 or Brian.Cheuvront@ncmail.net.

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NCCOOS

NCCOOS · Total News:· Total Reads: 1204

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  2006 Lionfish Cruise Logs (Dawg)

Most recent article:

2006 Lionfish Cruise Logs
by: Dawg
2006-07-31 07:59:05

2006 Lionfish Cruise Logs

The Indo-Pacific lionfish is native to the tropical and sub-tropical regions of the southwest Pacific, the Indian Ocean and the Red Sea. Lionfish were first reported by recreational SCUBA divers off the coast of North Carolina in 2000. They are primarily located in water depths from 100 to 260 ft (Figure 1 the map). Now in its third year, our research will expand on previous studies documenting a wide range distribution of lionfish with high abundances, comparable to many native species.

Abundance data from previous surveys serve as baseline estimates for determining population growth and geographic distribution of this species. We will determine if lionfish populations are increasing off the coast of North Carolina. This will establish a foundation for determining the impact of lionfish on native fish and invertebrate communities. We can accomplish this, in part, by expanding our native species surveys to include all native fishes, especially tropicals. We hope to identify those species that may be potential prey of lionfish which, when combined with dietary analysis lionfish, should allow assessment of an important ecological impact of lionfish introduction. In addition, a better understanding of lionfish reproductive potential and seasonality is a necessary component of this research. This information will allow researchers to assess the potential impact of the lionfish on native communities.

Lionfish have been found primarily in water depths greater than 100 ft off the coast of North Carolina where the warm Gulf Stream waters moderate bottom water temperatures year round. We have placed temperature sensors all along the seafloor to monitor seasonal bottom water temperatures to better understand the role of temperature in limiting lionfish distributions.


This year's activities include efforts to:

Conduct visual and video transect surveys to quantify lionfish and native fish species including tropical fish and likely prey of lionfish. This will be done on SCUBA at locations within Onslow Bay (Figure 1). (Dive Operations)

Collect live lionfish for reproduction and life history studies

Deploy and retrieve temperature sensors and submerged buoys. (Dive Operations)

Conduct multi-beam sonar transects to map and identify potential lionfish habitat off the coast of North Carolina.

Conduct plankton tows for presence of lionfish larvae

Divers decompressing or ‘hanging’ on pure Oxygen. Due to time limitations at depths greater than 120 ft. decompression allows divers to stay longer on the bottom, to conduct their research.

In this photo a lionfish is sharing space with several Caribbean lobsters. Lobsters are native to the North Carolina Shelf and areoften associated with lionfish under ledges and rock outcroppings such as this.

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NCDENR

NCDENR · Total News: 59 · Total Reads: 47274

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Marine Fisheries Commission seeks advisers (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Advisory Committees to Meet Jointly to Discuss Petition to Reclassify Coastal Wa (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  State observers out gathering information by watching anglers fish (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Marine Fisheries Commission Continues to Seek Advisers (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Marine Fisheries Commission Chooses Draft Management Measures for Blue Crab (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Marine Fisheries Commission Meeting Set for Morehead City (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Public Hearings Scheduled for Snapper Grouper Amendment 18A (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  COMMERCIAL LANDINGS DOWN; DOCKSIDE VALUE UP IN 2007 (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Recreational Fishing License (CRFL) Advisory Committee (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  RED DRUM FISH PRINTS STILL AVAILABLE FOR SALE (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

Marine Fisheries Commission seeks advisers
by: Capt_Dave
2014-09-23 09:57:59

Marine Fisheries Commission seeks advisers

MOREHEAD CITY – The N.C. Marine Fisheries Commission is looking for commercial and recreational fishermen and scientists to advise it on various fisheries issues.

Two regional advisory committees – Northern and Southern – and three standing advisory committees – Finfish, Habitat and Water Quality, and Shellfish/Crustacean – review matters referred to them by the commission, such as draft fishery management plans, and recommend management strategies. Committees may also bring issues pertaining to their region or subject matter to the commission’s attention.

The Marine Fisheries Commission chairman appoints members to these committees for three-year terms, and several terms will expire in January.

In addition, the commission is seeking a commercial pound net fisherman to serve on the Sea Turtle Advisory Committee.

To be qualified to serve on a committee, applicants may not have had a significant fisheries violation within the past three years.

Individuals interested in serving as an adviser should be willing to attend meetings at least once every two months and actively participate in the committee process, which includes reviewing scientific documents and issue papers to make recommendations on management strategies. Advisers will be reimbursed for travel and other expenses incurred in relation to their official duties.

Adviser applications are available online at http://portal.ncdenr.org/web/mf/mfc-advisory-committees, at Division of Marine Fisheries’ offices or by calling 252-808-8022 or 800-682-2632. Applications should be returned by Nov. 1 to the Division of Marine Fisheries, P.O. Box 769, Morehead City, N.C. 28557, Attention: Nancy Fish.

 

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NCDMF

NCDMF · Total News: 978 · Total Reads: 525210

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  State removing buoys that are no longer needed at artificial reefs (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  State certifies new state record African pompano (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  KING AND SPANISH MACKEREL (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Albemarle/Roanoke striped bass stock moved to concern in stock status report (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Marine Fisheries Commission seeks sea turtle advisers (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  SPOTTED SEATROUT RECREATIONAL (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Some waters to reopen to flounder gill nets (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Marine Fisheries Artificial Reef Program to hold public meeting on New Hanover C (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Coastal waters close to large-mesh gill net fishing Monday (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Spring/summer commercial red drum season will not open (Capt_Dave)
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Most recent article:

State removing buoys that are no longer needed at artificial reefs
by: Capt_Dave
2014-08-21 10:14:04

State removing buoys that are no longer needed at artificial reefs

MOREHEAD CITY – Over the next few weeks, the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries will remove the buoys from several artificial reef sites along the coast.

Staff plans to remove buoys from 11 artificial reef sites that are already accurately depicted on federal navigation charts or soon will be changed on the charts.

Technology has advanced to the point that the buoys are no longer necessary for safe navigation, and it is no longer cost-effective to maintain them, said Craig Hardy, chief of the division’s Habitat and Enhancement Section. GPS receivers are readily available at a low enough cost that nearly all boats that go offshore are equipped with them.

The buoys will be removed from:

North of Cape Hatteras

·         Artificial Reef-130 (no official name) 12.5 nautical miles north of the Oregon Inlet sea buoy

Hatteras to Cape Lookout

·         Artificial Reef – 230 ( Mr. J. C. Reef) 3.5 nautical miles south-southeast of the Hatteras Inlet sea buoy

Cape Lookout to Cape Fear

·         Artificial Reef – 320 (Clifton Moss Reef) 7.3 nautical miles west-southwest of the Beaufort Inlet Fort Macon jetty

·         Artificial Reef – 330 (Howard Chapin Reef) 11.8 nautical miles southwest of the Beaufort Inlet Fort Macon Jetty

·         Artificial Reef -345 (Swansboro Rotary Club Reef) 8.1 nautical miles southeast of the Bogue Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef -355 (New River Reef) 9.7 nautical miles south of the New River Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef -360 (Topsail Reef) 2.5 nautical miles east of the New Topsail Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef -362 (Tom Boyette Reef) 8.7 nautical miles east-southeast of the New Topsail Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 364 (Billy Murrell Reef) 6.2 nautical miles northeast of the Masonboro Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 372 (Bruce Barclay Cameron Memorial Reef) 5 nautical miles south-southeast of the Masonboro Inlet sea buoy

South of Cape Fear

·         Artificial Reef – 430 (Jim Knight Reef) 3.8 nautical miles east-southeast of the Lockwood’s Folly Inlet sea buoy

Buoys on another 25 artificial reefs will remain on station for two to four months longer until staff can verify that navigation charts accurately reflect their locations.

These Artificial Reef sites are:

North of Cape Hatteras

·         Artificial Reef – 140 (no official name) 8.9 nautical miles north of the Oregon Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 145 (no official name) 8.1 nautical miles northeast of Oregon Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 160 (Oregon Inlet Reef) 4.0 nautical miles south-southeast of the Oregon Inlet sea buoy

Cape Hatteras to Cape Lookout

·         Artificial Reef -220 (no official name) 4.9 nautical miles east-southeast of the Hatteras Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 225 (no official name) 6.2 nautical miles east-southeast of the Hatteras Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef - 250 (no official name) 5.1 nautical miles south-southeast of the Ocracoke Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 255 (no official name) 6.1 nautical miles south of the Ocracoke Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 275 (Billy Smith Reef) 2 nautical miles southeast of the north end of Drum Inlet

·         Artificial Reef – 285 (George Summerlin Reef) 4.4 nautical miles north-northeast of the Cape Lookout Shoal buoy R”2”

Cape Lookout to Cape Fear

·         Artificial Reef – 315 (Atlantic Beach Reef) 3.5 nautical miles West from Beaufort Inlet Fort Macon jetty

·         Artificial Reef – 342 (Onslow Bay Sport Fishing Club Reef) 3 nautical miles east-southeast of the Bogue Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 340 (J. Paul Tyndall Reef) 7 nautical miles east-southeast of the Bogue Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 366 (no official name) 30 nautical miles southeast of the Masonboro Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 368 (no official name) 15.5 nautical miles southeast of the Masonboro Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 370 (Meares Harris Reef) 3.5 nautical miles east of the Masonboro Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 376 (no official name) 9.9 nautical miles southeast of the Masonboro Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 378 (Phillip Wolfe Reef) 2.6 nautical miles south of the Carolina Beach Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 386 (Lennon / Hyde Reef) 17.8 nautical miles south-southeast of the Masonboro Inlet sea buoy

South of Cape Fear

·         Artificial Reef – 420 (Tom McGlammery Reef) 3.1 nautical miles north-northwest of the Cape Fear River sea bouy

·         Artificial Reef – 425 (Yaupon Beach Reef) 5 nautical miles north of the Cape Fear River sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 440 (Brunswick County Fishing Club Reef) 4.5 nautical miles south-southeast of the Lockwood’s Folly Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 445 (Dale McDowell Reef) 9.3 nautical miles south of the Lockwood’s Folly Inlet sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 455 (Dale Ward Reef) 10.6 nautical miles west of the Cape Fear River sea buoy

·         Artificial Reef – 460 (Jolly Mon Reef) 3.0 nautical miles south of the Shallotte Inlet sea buoy

These sites were first charted in the 1970s using the now antiquated LORAN radio navigation system. Since LORAN coordinates do not always accurately translate to GPS coordinates, the navigation charts need to be verified before the buoys can be removed.

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New Download

New Download · Total News: 13 · Total Reads: 15260

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  ON-BOARD HANDLING OF SASHIMI-GRADE TUNA (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  New DownLoads (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Analysis of Fishing Vessel Casualties (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Are Circle Hooks Effective? (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NORTH CAROLINA BOATING ACCIDENT STATISTICS - 2002 (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend   NAVIGATION RULES AND REGULATIONS (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  LIGHT LIST Volume II ATLANTIC COAST (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  2003 REPORT TO CONGRESS (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend   Fisheries Focus and Habitat Hotline Atlantic (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Public Hearing Document on Marine Protected Areas (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

ON-BOARD HANDLING OF SASHIMI-GRADE TUNA
by: Dawg
2004-12-21 03:55:17

ON-BOARD HANDLING OF SASHIMI-GRADE TUNA

A Practical Guide for Crew Members

DownLoad YOUR Copy HERE

Thanks To Captain Don for the GREAT find...

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NMFS Permit Shop

NMFS Permit Shop · Total News: 68 · Total Reads: 43520

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NMFS Solicits Proposals for MAFMC 2013 Research Set-Aside Program (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Atlantic Highly Migratory Species News (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  2008 Bluefish Specifications Announced (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NMFS announces Atlantic Shark Identification Workshops (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Atlantic bluefin tuna (BFT) retention limits (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  PERMITS FOR 2007 ARE NOW AVAILABLE (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NMFS Proposes Initial Atlantic Bluefin Tuna Quotas (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Daily Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (BFT) Retention Limit (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  General Category 3 Fish Bag Limit Extended and Restricted Fishing Days waived fo (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  General Category 3 Fish Bag Limit Extended and Restricted Fishing Days waived fo (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

NMFS Solicits Proposals for MAFMC 2013 Research Set-Aside Program
by: Capt_Dave
2012-02-21 19:52:49

NMFS Solicits Proposals for MAFMC 2013 Research Set-Aside Program

 

The National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) announced that it is accepting proposals under the Mid-Atlantic Council's Research Set-Aside (RSA) Program for research activities to be conducted in 2013.  Applications must be received by NMFS on or before 5 p.m. EST on April 2, 2012.

 

The Council, in coordination with NMFS and the Atlantic States Marine Fisheries Commission, may set aside up to 3 percent of the total allowable landings (TAL) in certain Mid-Atlantic fisheries to be used for research endeavors.  The RSA program provides a mechanism to fund research and compensate vessel owners through the sale of fish harvested under the research quota.  Vessels participating in an approved research project may be authorized by the NMFS Northeast Regional Administrator to harvest and land species in excess of any imposed trip limit or during fishery closures.  Landings from such trips are sold to generate funds that help defray the costs associated with the approved research projects. No Federal funds are provided for research under this notification.

 

NMFS is soliciting proposals for research activities concerning the summer flounder, scup, black sea bass, Loligo squid, Illex squid, Atlantic mackerel, butterfish, river herring, bluefish, and tilefish fisheries.  NMFS and the Council will give priority to funding proposals addressing the research needs as follows:

 

2013 Research Priority List

 

 

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NOAA Fisheries

NOAA Fisheries · Total News: 378 · Total Reads: 192024

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NOAA Announces New Regulations for King and Spanish Mackerel in the Gulf of Mexi (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NOAA Fisheries Published a Final Rule to Modify Management of Vermilion Snapper (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  August 2013 Opening of Commercial and Recreational Red Snapper Season in the Sou (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Status of Possible Opening in 2013 of Commercial and Recreational Red Snapper Se (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Recreational Harvest of Snowy Grouper Closing to Vessels Fishing in the South At (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NOAA Fisheries Requests Public Comments on Actions to Improve Management of Verm (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NOAA Fisheries Seeks Comments on Proposed Actions for Red Snapper in the South A (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Commercial Harvest of Red Snapper and Gray Triggerfish in the South Atlantic Fed (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NOAA Fisheries Publishes a Final Rule to Allow Transfer of Black Sea Bass Pot En (Capt_Dave)
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NOAA Announces New Regulations for King and Spanish Mackerel in the Gulf of Mexi
by: Capt_Dave
2014-06-17 09:06:56

NOAA Announces New Regulations for King and Spanish Mackerel in the Gulf of Mexico and Atlantic Region

A new rule, effective July 16, 2014, will change the coastal migratory pelagics permit requirements and restrictions, including modification of the sales provisions and income requirements.

For the Gulf of Mexico, the rule prohibits the sale of king and Spanish mackerel caught under the bag limit unless those fish are either caught on a for-hire trip and the vessel has both a for-hire and commercial vessel permit, or the fish are caught as part of a state-permitted tournament and the proceeds from the sale are donated to charity.

For the Atlantic region, the rule prohibits the sale of king and Spanish mackerel caught under the bag limit unless the fish are caught as part of a state-permitted tournament and the proceeds from the sale are donated to charity.

In addition, the rule removes the income qualification requirement for king and Spanish mackerel commercial vessel permits.

NOAA Fisheries with the Gulf of Mexico and South Atlantic Fishery Management Councils developed an amendment to the management plan for coastal migratory pelagics containing these management measures. The final rule implementing the regulations published in the Federal Register on June 16, 2014.

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NOAA News

NOAA News · Total News: 405 · Total Reads: 211146

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Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NOAA, UNC-Wilmington study finds warming Atlantic ocean temperatures could incre (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NOAA proposes to designate critical habitat for loggerhead sea turtles in NW Atl (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Commerce Inspector General Begins Review of Catch Share Programs (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NOAA Names Richard D. Methot, Jr., New NOAA Science Advisor for Stock Assessment (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  U.S. Commerce Department Announces 2012 Regional Fishery Council Appointments (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NOAA Honors Fishery Management Councils (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  U.S., European Union to strengthen cooperation to combat illegal fishing (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  The Road to End Overfishing: 35 Years of Magnuson Act (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NOAAs Reponse To Oil Spill (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Lubchenco Will Helm U.S. National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (Capt_Dave)
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NOAA, UNC-Wilmington study finds warming Atlantic ocean temperatures could incre
by: Capt_Dave
2014-09-17 17:56:41

Warming water temperatures due to climate change could expand the range of many native species of tropical fish, including the invasive and poisonous lionfish, according to a study of 40 species along rocky and artificial reefs off North Carolina by researchers from NOAA and the University of North Carolina-Wilmington.

The findings, reported for the first time, were published in the September issue of Marine Ecology Progress Series.

“The results will allow us to better understand how the fish communities might shift under different climate change scenarios and provide the type of environmental data to inform future decisions relating to the management and siting of protected areas,” said Paula Whitfield, a research ecologist at NOAA’s National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science (NCCOS) and lead author of the study.

The North Carolina reefs lie within the temperate-tropical transition zone, where historically, both temperate and tropical species live, at their respective range limits. However, water temperatures in the zone are becoming more tropical, making it an important place to detect climate changes and its impacts.

The researchers first  made these discoveries during an ecological study of the marine communities on the North Carolina reefs. Findings from this earlier study showed similar shifts of climate change induced shifts in algal populations.

Researchers combined year-round bottom water temperature data with 2006-2010 fish community surveys in water depths from 15 to 150 feet off the coast of North Carolina. The study revealed that the fish community was primarily tropical in the deeper areas surveyed, from 122 to 150 feet, with a winter mean temperature of 21 °C (69.8 °F). However, many of these native tropical fishes, usually abundant in shallow, somewhat cooler reefs, tended to remain in the deeper, warmer water, suggesting that temperature is a main factor in controlling their distribution.

“Globally, fish communities are becoming more tropical as a result of warming temperatures,  as fish move to follow their optimal temperature range.,” said Whitfield. “Along the North Carolina coast, warming water temperatures may allow the expansion of tropical fish species, such as lionfish, into areas that were previously uninhabitable due to cold winter temperatures. The temperature thresholds collected in this study will allow us to detect and to estimate fish community changes related to water temperature.”

“This kind of monitoring data set is quite rare because it combines multi-year quantitative fish density data with continuous bottom water temperature data from the same location,” said Jonathan A. Hare, NOAA Fisheries research oceanographer and a co-author on the study.

Similarly, the distribution of the venomous Indo-Pacific lionfish (Pterois volitans), a species new to the Atlantic since 2000, was restricted to water depths deeper than 87 feet where the average water temperature was higher than 15.2°C (approximately 59.4 °F). As the more shallow waters warm, lionfish may expand their range, since they seem to be attracted to areas with a warmer  minimum temperature. Although lionfish only arrived in North Carolina in 2000 they were the most common species observed in water depths from 122 to 150 feet in this study.

Since their first sighting off the Florida east coast, in the late 1980s, lionfish have spread throughout the western North Atlantic including the Gulf of Mexico and Caribbean. They are considered a major threat to Atlantic reefs by reducing reef fish recruitment and biomass, and have been implicated in cascading impacts such as decreased coral cover on coral reefs. To date, cold winter bottom temperatures are the only factor found to control their distribution on a large scale.

NOAA’s mission is to understand and predict changes in the Earth's environment, from the depths of the ocean to the surface of the sun, and to conserve and manage our coastal and marine resources. Join us on Facebook, Twitter and our other social media channels.

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North Carolina Coastal Federation

North Carolina Coastal Federation · Total News:· Total Reads: 3907

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Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Commercial Fishermen Needed to Remove Marine Debris (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Trash to Treasure: New Oyster Shell Recycling Drop-Off Centers Being Built in Ja (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Go Native Plant Sale Set for Earth Day Weekend (Dawg)

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Commercial Fishermen Needed to Remove Marine Debris
by: Capt_Dave
2014-09-16 10:49:06

Commercial Fishermen Needed to Remove Marine Debris
 
MANTEO - The N. C. Coastal Federation is accepting applications from commercial fishermen to help get marine debris out of the water this winter.

The federation and the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries, in January, will continue a pilot project to remove abandoned fishing gear from waters in northeastern North Carolina. Using a grant from the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, the federation will employ commercial watermen to help the N.C. Marine Patrol remove old gear from Jan. 15 to Feb. 7. No crab pots are allowed in the water during that time. The cleanup is scheduled to begin on Jan. 19, if the weather cooperates. This project is intended to improve habitat and water quality and support commercial watermen in northeastern North Carolina.

The collection will take place from the Currituck Sound southward to Oregon Inlet, including parts of the Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds. Local fishermen with knowledge of these waters will be given preference.  Side-scan sonar will be used on a limited number of boats to detect abandoned gear underwater. A side-scan sonar unit will be provided for these boats, and an additional day of training will be required for these fishermen.

To qualify, fishermen must have filed at least one commercial landing trip ticket with the division within the past year.  Fishermen will receive $300 a day and their mates will receive $100. Three days of work are guaranteed. About 12 fishermen will be accepted, and volunteers are also needed.

Applications are due on Oct. 17. Participants will be notified by Oct. 31.  Applications are available online on the N.C. Coastal Federation's web site, www.nccoast.org;  Oneal's Sea Harvest in Wanchese; The Rope Shop in Manteo; and Full Circle Crab Co. in Columbia. 

For more information, or an application contact Ladd Bayliss at 252.473.1607 or laddb@nccoast.org.

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North Carolina Fisheries Association

North Carolina Fisheries Association · Total News: 209 · Total Reads: 132958

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Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  WEEKLY UPDATE: 02/14/11 (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  WEEKLY UPDATE: 11/19/10 (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  WEEKLY UPDATE: 10/15/10 (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  WEEKLY UPDATE: 10/08/10 (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  WEEKLY UPDATE: 06/18/10 (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NORTH CAROLINA FISHERIES ASSOCIATION (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NORTH CAROLINA FISHERIES ASSOCIATION (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  WEEKLY UPDATE: 12/16/09 (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  WEEKLY UPDATE: 11/20/09 (Capt_Dave)
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WEEKLY UPDATE: 02/14/11
by: Capt_Dave
2011-01-14 15:30:21

 

Regarding Speckled Trout Closing the Division answers questions: See proclamation below
 
When do you intend on reopening speckled trout?   "The Marine Fisheries Commission will discuss the current closure at their meeting in Pine Knoll shores on February 10th and direct me to either continue the closure into the spawning season (~July 1), keep it closed for the remainder of the year, or re-open.  Presently, my feeling is to recommend that the season remain closed until June 1 or July 1.  We will have to see how things play out for the rest of this winter and see what we have out there in the spring."
 How is this moratorium supposed to save trout that died 3 weeks ago?  "It can’t.  The intent of the closure is to protect what is left to spawn this spring.  With high recreational and commercial catches in 2008 and 2009, coupled with cold stun events scattered throughout much of the state in January 2010, December 2010, and January 2011 I felt a temporary closure was the best thing for the resource.  While we may indeed lose some opportunities to pick up dead fish, we may gain some much needed spawning stock biomass by avoiding any directed harvest and leaving the “stunned” fish alone.  This was a very difficult decision but one I made with the best interest of the resource in mind."
 
Barney Frank to Obama Administration on Fishing - "This is Unacceptable"
Calling the U.S. Commerce Department's attitude toward the fishing industry "unacceptable," U.S. Rep. Barney Frank, D-Mass., said "I have worked with the Obama administration on a number of important issues ... and I will continue to be supportive of our common public policy goals. But the president must understand that if the administration persists in such a serious assault on the livelihood of the working men and women of the fishing industry, it will make it difficult for me and others to maintain this degree of cooperation."
 
Massachusetts Governor, Attorney General File Brief Challenging Implementation of Federal Fisheries Regulation Rules violate national standards due to "unreasonably low" catch limits, inadequate consideration of socioeconomic impacts BOSTON - January 13, 2011 - Attorney General Martha Coakley today filed on behalf of Governor Deval Patrick a "friend of the Court" brief charging that federal fisheries regulations on the Massachusetts ground fishing fleet violate established national standards by setting annual catch limits (ACLs) unreasonably low and failing to consider the economic and social impacts on commercial fishermen and fishing communities. See www.ncfish.org for full story.
 
Come on NC we need to challenge the feds too; our state needs to step up and fight back.
 
Nation's Top Port Newspaper calls for Fishermen to Protest on the Potomac 
The Standard-Times, a Dow Jones newspaper serving the top-value fishing port in America has called for fishermen from New Bedford and Gloucester to "do what farmers did with their tractors in the 1970s" and bring their protest to Washington with a peaceful floating protest on the Potomac. The paper argues that fishermen deserve "a full investigation by Congress and the Commerce Department's inspector general" as "[n]either a letter from the governor nor the urging of members of Congress has made a difference."
 
Atlantic Highly Migratory Species News
NMFS announces a proposed rule entitled "Bluefin Tuna Bycatch Reduction in the Gulf of Mexico Pelagic Longline Fishery" which would implement weak hooks in the Gulf of Mexico pelagic longline fishery to reduce bluefin tuna bycatch and bycatch mortality.  Versions of the HMS News Notice and Weak Hook Fact Sheet are also available in Vietnamese.  These documents can also be found on the HMS Management Division's Webpage at: http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov/sfa/hms/
 
PROCLAMATIONS: Details of proclamations are on NCDMF's website www.ncfisheries.net   
RE: SPOTTED SEATROUT
Effective 12:00 Noon, Friday, January 14, 2011, the following will apply to spotted seatrout:
I. HARVEST RESTRICTIONS it is unlawful to possess spotted seatrout in coastal and joint fishing waters of North Carolina. http://www.ncfisheries.net/procs/procs2011/FF-007-2011.html
 
RE: POUND NET SET CLOSURE PERIOD
Effective at 6:00 P.M. Saturday, January 15, 2011, the following restrictions will apply to pound net sets: I. AREA DESCRIPTION All Internal Fishing Waters of the state except those waters of Albemarle Sound west of a line beginning at a point 36º 04.5184’N - 75º 47.9095’W on Powell Point; running southerly to a point 35º 57.2681’N - 75º 48.3999’W on Caroon Point.
II. POUND NET SET CLOSURE It is unlawful to fail to remove all nets from pound net sets in commercial fishing operations from 6:00 P.M. January 15, 2011 to midnight January 31, 2011 in the area described in I. above. http://www.ncfisheries.net/procs/procs2011/M-001-2011.html
 
RE: SPINY DOGFISH-COMMERCIAL FISHING OPERATIONS
Effective at 12:01 A.M. Sunday, January 16, 2011 the following restrictions will apply to the harvest of spiny dogfish in the waters of North Carolina. I. HARVEST LIMITS, AREAS AND TRIP LIMITS During the period beginning at 12:01 A.M., Sunday, January 16, 2011 and ending at 6:00 P.M., Saturday, January 22, 2011, the following trip limits apply to these geographic areas: A. BROWNS INLET - NORTH – No commercial fishing operation, regardless of the number of people involved, may possess more than 3,000 pounds of spiny dogfish per day east and north of a line beginning at a point 34° 37.0000’N – 77° 15.000’W; running southeasterly to a point 34° 32.0000’N – 77° 10.0000’W. B. BROWNS INLET- SOUTH – No commercial fishing operation, regardless of the number of people involved, may possess more than 500 pounds of spiny dogfish per day west and south of a line beginning at a point 34° 37.0000’N – 77° 15.000’W; running southeasterly to a point 34° 32.0000’N – 77° 10.0000’W.  http://www.ncfisheries.net/procs/procs2011/FF-005-REVISED-2011.html
 
RE:STRIPED BASS SEASON – OCEAN TRAWL: ATLANTIC OCEAN
Effective at 12:01 A.M., Saturday, January 15, 2011, the season for the harvest of striped bass with ocean trawls in the Atlantic Ocean waters of North Carolina SHALL OPEN. The following restrictions will apply: I. SIZE LIMIT No person may possess, transport, buy, sell, or offer for sale striped bass less than 28 inches total length taken with ocean trawls from the Atlantic Ocean. II. HARVEST RESTRICTIONS A. It is unlawful to take or possess striped bass from the Atlantic Ocean in a trawl operation without having an Atlantic Ocean Striped Bass Commercial Gear Permit designated for the trawl fishery. B. It is unlawful for an Atlantic Ocean Striped Bass Commercial Gear Permit trawl holder to possess, land or sell more than 50 striped bass per vessel, per day, regardless of the number of permit holders on board, during the harvest period beginning at 12:01 A.M., Saturday, January 15, 2011 and ending at 6:00 P.M. Thursday, January 20, 2011. http://www.ncfisheries.net/procs/procs2011/FF-008-2011.html
 
RE: STRIPED BASS SEASON –GILL NETS ATLANTIC OCEAN
Effective at 12:01 A.M., Tuesday, January 18, 2011 the season for the harvest of striped bass with gill nets in the Atlantic Ocean waters of North Carolina SHALL OPEN. The following restrictions shall apply: I. SIZE LIMIT No person may possess, transport, buy, sell or offer for sale striped bass less than 28 inches total length taken with ocean gill nets from the Atlantic Ocean. II. HARVEST RESTRICTIONS A. It is unlawful to possess striped bass taken with a gill net from the Atlantic Ocean without having an Atlantic Ocean Striped Bass Commercial Gear Permit (AOSBCGP) designated for the gill net fishery. B. The quota for the gill net fishery will be 160,160 pounds. C. It is unlawful for an Atlantic Ocean Striped Bass Commercial Gear Permit gill net permit holder to sell or possess more than 20 striped bass per calendar day during the open season. An ocean gill net operation consisting of more than one AOSBCGP designated gill net permit holder may land or sell no more than two daily harvest limits (40 fish). An AOSBCGP designated gill net permit holder must accompany each single harvest limit (20 fish) until the time of sale to a dealer who possesses a valid 2010/2011 Striped Bass Dealer Permit validated for the Atlantic Ocean. D. Harvest will be allowed on Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday and Friday, January 18, 19, 20 and 21, 2011 unless closed earlier by proclamation when the harvest quota is reached. E. For the purpose of this proclamation, a gill net is defined as a net deployed from and retrieved into a vessel and set vertically in the water to capture fish by entanglement by the gills in its mesh as a result of net design, construction, and mesh size, webbing diameter or method in which it is used. http://www.ncfisheries.net/procs/procs2011/FF-009-2011.html
 
 

Meetings

January 19, 2011 at 6 p.m.
Central/Southern Management Area Striped Bass Advisory Committee
N.C. Department of Environment and Natural Resources Regional Office
943 Washington Square Mall, Washington
Contact: Katy West
E-mail: Katy.West@ncdenr.gov
Phone: 1-800-338-7804 or (252) 946-6481
 
January 24th NCFA Board Meeting
Core Sound Waterfowl Museum
1785 Island Rd
Harkers Island, NC 28531-9670
(252) 728-1500

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North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commis

North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commis · Total News: 43 · Total Reads: 29892

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Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  MEETINGS TO DISCUSS FUTURE RED DRUM MANAGEMENT (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  CULTCH PLANTING MEETINGS TO BE HELD IN FEB. & MARCH (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Marine Fisheries Commission (MFC) Central Regional Advisory Committee (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  MARINE FISHERIES COMMISSION TO MEET NOVEMBER 30 & DECEMBER 1 (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Wildlife Resources Commission Warns of Kite Tube Dangers (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Young Anglers Win Lifetime Fishing Licenses (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Boats and Booze Can Prove a Dangerous Mix (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Removal of Cape Fear River Locks and Dams Could Improve Fish Populations (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Donors Help Outer Banks Center for Wildlife Education Come Alive (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  New Report Shows Landmark Success of Wildlife Grants Program (Dawg)
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MEETINGS TO DISCUSS FUTURE RED DRUM MANAGEMENT
by: Capt_Dave
2008-03-14 06:04:44

MEETINGS TO DISCUSS FUTURE RED DRUM MANAGEMENT
 
MOREHEAD CITY – A series of meetings will begin next week offering the public an opportunity to discuss future management of North Carolina’s red drum fishery.
 
The five meetings will detail proposals in a draft update to the state’s Red Drum Fishery Management Plan. A fishery management plan makes long-term regulatory recommendations for a fishery.
 
The meetings will be held:
 
Tuesday, March 4                      6 p.m.                         McKimmon Center
1101 Gorman Street
Raleigh

Wednesday, March 5                      6 p.m.                   Craven County Agriculture Building
300 Industrial Drive
New Bern

Thursday, March 6                         6:30 p.m.                Hatteras Civic Center
Hwy. 12
Hatteras

Tuesday, March 11                      6:30 p.m.                 Dobo Hall
Room 103
University of North Carolina-Wilmington
Wilmington

Wednesday, April 2              Noon                           Department of Environment and
Natural Resources Regional Office
943 Washington Square Mall
Washington
 
These meetings are being held in conjunction with scheduled advisory committee meetings for the Marine Fisheries Commission.
 
            Since April 2007, an advisory group, consisting of commercial and recreational fishermen, scientists, and N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries staff, has been discussing issues relating to the red drum fishery so as to revise the 2001 fishery management plan. The advisory committee drafted the proposed plan, now going out for public input.
 
           Once the public meetings are complete, the Marine Fisheries Commission will endorse all or portions of the plan, which is then sent to the Department of Environment and Natural Resources and the General Assembly for review and comment. The draft plan will come back before the Marine Fisheries Commission for any modifications and then the rulemaking process begins. When rulemaking is complete, the commission adopts the final plan and implements any needed rules.
 
           Included in the draft Red Drum Fishery Management Plan are management recommendations for trip and gear limits, educational outreach, environmental concerns and data needs. The public is encouraged to attend these meetings and share their thoughts on the future of the red drum fishery.
 
           Recommended changes to commercial harvest regulations
 
           Continue the current commercial regulations, which are a 250,000-pound annual harvest cap, prohibited possession of fish greater than 27 inches and a seven fish trip limit with a provision requiring that red drum make up no more than 50 percent of the total catch. The director of the Division of Marine Fisheries has authority to modify the trip limit.
 
           Or
 
          Continue the current 250,000-pound annual harvest cap, but increase the trip limit to 10 fish; allow possession of up to three fish while fishing, prior to meeting the 50-percent bycatch provision, so long as the total catch, upon landing, meets the 50-percent bycatch provision
 
          Recommended changes to attendance requirements for small mesh gill nets (smaller than 5-inches stretched mesh)
 
          Lengthen the seasonal attendance requirement for small mesh gill nets (currently May 1 – Oct. 31) to May 1 through Dec. 31 in primary and permanent secondary nursery areas and modified no-trawl areas, within 200 yards of the shoreline in areas north of Core Sound and within 100 yards of the shoreline in Core Sound and waters south.
 
          Or
 
          Require year-round attendance of small mesh gill nets in primary and permanent secondary nursery areas, except for the Albemarle Sound Management Area, Core Sound and waters south; lengthen the seasonal attendance (currently May 1 – Oct. 31) to May 1 – Nov. 31 in primary and permanent secondary nursery areas and modified no-trawl areas in Core Sound and waters south; and lengthen the attendance season to May 1 – Nov. 31 within 200 yards of the shoreline statewide, except for Core Sound and waters south during October and November
 
          Recommended changes to attendance requirements for large mesh gill nets (greater than 5 inches stretched mesh)
 
          Require unattended large mesh gill nets to be set a minimum of 25 yards from shore from June through October.
 
          Or
 
          Require unattended large mesh gill nets to be set parallel from shore and a minimum of 10 feet from shore in all state waters.
 
          Recreational size and bag limits
 
          No changes are recommended to the current recreational slot size and creel limit of one fish per day between 18 inches and 27 inches.
 
          Visit http://www.ncdmf.net/download/RDFMP_revised%20draf_%202-19-08.pdf to view the Red Drum Fishery Management Plan. For more information about red drum management, please contact Lee Paramore by e-mail at lee.paramore@ncmail.net or by calling 252-473-5734

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NTSB

NTSB · Total News: 38 · Total Reads: 27405

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Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  CAPTAINS DECISION TO SAIL INTO THE PATH OF A HURRICANE CAUSED THE TALL SHIP BOU (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  CREW MISTAKES CAUSED HEELING OF CROWN PRINCESS CRUISE SHIP (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  SAFETY BOARD DETERMINES 2006 MASSACHUSETTS FERRY FIRE CAUSED BY DIESEL FUEL CONT (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Capsizing of U.S. Small Passenger Vessel Lady D (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NTSB ACTING CHAIRMAN ROSENKER ADDRESSES MARINE CONFERENCE, HIGHLIGHTS PARTNERSHI (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NTSB ACTING CHAIRMAN ROSENKER ADDRESSES MARINE CONFERENCE, HIGHLIGHTS PARTNERSHI (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NTSB DETERMINES IMPROPERLY INSTALLED FUEL-INJECTION LINE CAUSED FIRE ON A SMALL (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NTSB DETERMINES IMPROPERLY INSTALLED FUEL-INJECTION LINE CAUSED FIRE ON A SMALL (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Safety Recommendation M-06-5 through -9 (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  The National Transportation Safety Board recommends that the (Dawg)
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CAPTAINS DECISION TO SAIL INTO THE PATH OF A HURRICANE CAUSED THE TALL SHIP BOU
by: Capt_Dave
2014-02-10 18:45:04

CAPTAIN’S DECISION TO SAIL INTO THE PATH OF A HURRICANE CAUSED THE TALL SHIP BOUNTY TO SINK OFF ATLANTIC COAST

February 10, 2014

WASHINGTON – A captain’s “reckless decision to sail into the well-forecasted path of Hurricane Sandy” was the probable cause of the sinking of a ship off the North Carolina coast in October 2012, the National Transportation Safety Board said in a report released today. The captain and one crewmember died in the accident. Three other crewmembers were seriously injured.

On the evening of October 25, 2012, a day after a closely watched developing storm had reached hurricane strength, the 108-foot-long tall wooden ship, the Bounty, set sail from New London, Conn., for St. Petersburg, Fla., into the forecasted path of Superstorm Sandy. The 52-year-old vessel, a replica of the original 18th Century British Admiralty ship of the same name, was built for MGM Studios for the 1962 movie, “Mutiny on the Bounty.”

Prior to setting off from New London, some of the crewmembers had expressed their concerns to the captain that sailing into a severe storm could put all of them and the ship at risk. The captain assured the crew that the Bounty could handle the rough seas and that the voyage would be a success. Just a month earlier, in an interview with a Maine TV station, the captain said that the Bounty “chased hurricanes,” and by getting close to the eye of the storm, sailors could use hurricane winds to their advantage.

The 16-page report details how a mostly inexperienced crew – some injured from falls, others seasick and fatigued from the constant thrashing of 30-foot seas – struggled for many hours to keep the ships engines running and bilge pumps operating so the seawater filling the vessel would not overtake it.

In the early morning hours of October 29, 2012, about 110 miles southeast of Cape Hatteras, N.C., the Bounty heeled sharply to the starboard side after taking on more than 10 feet of water in the final hours of a three and a half day voyage that the NTSB said, “should never have been attempted.”

Despite hurricane winds gusting upwards of 100 mph, the U.S. Coast Guard was able to rescue all but two of the Bounty’s 16 crewmembers by hoisting them from the sea into three Jayhawk helicopters in the midst of the storm. The body of one crewmember was found, still in a protective immersion suit, about 10 hours after rescue operations had commenced. The captain was presumed lost at sea; his body was never recovered.

“Although this wooden ship was modeled after an 18th century vessel, the Captain had access to 21st century hurricane modeling tools that predicted the path and severity of Hurricane Sandy,” said NTSB Chairman Deborah A.P. Hersman. “The Bounty’s crew was put into an extraordinarily hazardous situation through decisions that by any measure didn’t prioritize safety.”

Prior to setting to sea, the Bounty had been in a Maine shipyard for maintenance and repairs, most of which was accomplished by a crew with little experience in such specialized work. One of their tasks was to caulk and reseam a wooden hull, which had known areas of rot, with compounds supplied by the captain, including a silicone sealant marketed for household use.

The entity that owned and operated the ship, HMS Bounty Organization, LLC, did nothing to dissuade the captain from sailing into known severe weather conditions. The NTSB said that such a lack of effective safety oversight by the vessel organization contributed to the sinking.

The entire report is available at http://www.ntsb.gov/doclib/reports/2014/MAB1403.pdf

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Ocean Isle Fishing Center

Ocean Isle Fishing Center · Total News:· Total Reads: 3024

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Ocean Isle Fishing Center Fishing Report (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Ocean Isle Fishing Center - Fishing Report 05-11-06 (Dawg)

Most recent article:

Ocean Isle Fishing Center Fishing Report
by: Dawg
2006-05-24 07:40:30

Ocean Isle Fishing Center Fishing Report

Ahoy Fellow Fishermen,
News from the NC coast. The fishing is red-hot! The Gulf Stream action in particular has heated up to a fevered pitch as the Dolphin have shown up in full force to join the scattered 45-60 pound Yellowfin and 20-50 pound Wahoo. This past weekend, I hosted one of my Gulf Stream fishing schools and my "students" were all boat owners interested in learning more about Gulf Stream trolling so they could translate the skills they learned to their own boat. We had a "ground school" meeting on Saturday PM in which we covered as much how, when and where as possible to get a good feeling on why the fish do what they do and what you can be done to have more success. All of this was in preparation of a full day of Gulf Stream fishing aboard the ShowTime with me as the boat driver only, the students do all the rigging and catching. We decided to head to the Black Jack area due to the previous day's report, and the action picked up right where Capt. Roger and Jon left it. We stopped and started setting lines 3 miles inshore of the BJ and almost had the 4th line out when a wahoo took the flatline, first fish in the boat. We reset 2 lines and this time a Blackfin tuna hit on the Green Machine/bird combo. Then, one of the guys was dropping the flat lined Cape Lookout C-Jet into place when it was nailed by a 30lb wahoo. Lines started to go out again and then a Dolphin attack. It was like this until noon when the guys finally got all 7 lines out, but that was only because I pulled off the temperature break and offshore to look around the bottom structure to see if the wahoo or tuna might be holding on it. We rested a bit, dealt with a couple of stray Dolphin, then I headed back inshore 1/2 mile and just as we were getting close to the temperature edge the Green Machine/bird combo was nailed and smoked off to the tune of a 45 pound Yellowfin tuna. The Dolphin were everywhere with most in the 12-20 pound range and there was a good mix of tuna and wahoo. Just to set the bar for the Far Out Shoot Out this coming weekend, our 1 fish per species, 3 fish aggregate weight of tuna, dolphin and wahoo was 95 pounds. And that has been the way the fishing has been for over a week now. The Dolphin keep you on your toes and the occasional Wahoo and Yellowfin shows up to sweaten the box. All this great offshore fishing comes just in time for this weekend's RAMPAGE YACHTS/GREGORY POOLE CAT Far Out Shootout presented by THE GPS STORE. The weather forecast for Saturday and Sunday looks great, and I am hoping to have a big turnout to fish the tournament. One question I'm getting is can we fish from our home port? The answer is yes. The tournament has no check-out or boundaries. So long as you follow the rules and fish only during lines-in time (8:30am-4pm) and you make it back to weigh your fish at the Ocean Isle Fishing Center by 8pm, you are legal. We've got a great Capt. Meeting dinner planned for Friday at 6pm, so don't miss that. If you need an entry form or more information, you can go to
http://oifishingcenter.com/tournaments.cfm or call (910) 575-FISH.
Schedule:
Friday, May 26th
6:00pm - Registration at the Ocean Isle Fishing Center 6:30pm- Dinner and Capt. Meeting

 

May 27th or May 28th (you can fish either day, 1 day only and you must declare by 6am the day you are fishing) 8:30am - Lines In 4:00pm - Lines Out 8:00pm - Weigh-in, pig pickin' and awards (details announced at Capt. Meeting)

Also, if you are interested in fishing the tournament and need crew, email captbrant@oifishingcenter.com and I'll post your info. on the site to help match you with interested fishermen.
***As a reminder, PLEASE PLEaSE everyone ride the free off island shuttle. There will not be any parking at the OIFC or elsewhere on the island. The shuttle is free, no hassel looking for a parking space that doesn't exist, no parking ticket hassels from Wildlife or the Town, and all shuttle riders will be eligible for drawing for rods/reels/ ect. The only way we can have these tourneys is to use the shuttle so please help us out by riding it. The shuttle will begin running Friday around noon until 9:00pm and on Sunday from 4:00pm to 9:00pm for the weighin and awards ceremony. Thanks for your co-operation.

OTHER FISHING NEWS:
The King Mackerel fishing has really turned on in the 50-65 foot depth range. Spots such as the 390/390, Shark Hole, Jungle, Lighthouse Rocks.... are all holding lots of kings, albeit most small in the 6-10 pound range. Slow trolling dead Cigar minnows on skirted rigs will result in multiple hookups and screaming reels. Also, the cobia are starting to show on inshore artificial reefs. These tasty and hard fighting fish can be quite the challenge. The best way to get them to bite is with a brown eel as bait- its like dangling an onion ring in front of my dog Doppler, it won't last long! You can either use live brown eels on a single nose hook or use a dead one rigged on a 1/2-1 oz jig head. If you pull up to a reef and don't see the cobia come to the boat immediately, rig a brown eel on a jig head and drop it to the bottom. Jig it across the bottom and through the water column. If there's a cobia there, he'll find your bait in minutes-- also, don't forget the chum. Also, the Grouper are biting in 80-110 feet of water and the inshore fishing for flounder and big speckled trout continues very good.
For up-to-date fishing reports with photos, visit
http://oifishingcenter.com/fishing_report.cfm . Hope you'll make it the tournament this weekend for a shot at $$$ and most important, bragging rights.
Have a safe and fun holiday and tight lines- Capt. Brant

 

Ocean Isle Fishing Center
65 Causeway Drive-Ocean Isle Beach, NC 28469

(910) 575-FISH

 www.oifishingcenter.com

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Pew Institute for Ocean Science

Pew Institute for Ocean Science · Total News: 29 · Total Reads: 20951

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Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  2007 U.S. OCEAN POLICY REPORT CARD (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NAVY SONAR BAN IN SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA UPHELD (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  CORALS GROWING SMALLER (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  FISH PERISH AS CLIMATE CHANGE DISRUPTS OCEAN SYSTEMS (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  MORE OCEANIC SHARKS ADDED TO THE IUCN RED LIST (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  MOST DEPLETED STOCKS NOT RECOVERING, RESEARCHERS SAY (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  U.S. SENATE STRENGTHENS FISHERIES PROTECTIONS (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  SCIENTISTS CALL FOR BAN ON SALE OF CORALS (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NEW SPECIES OF HAMMERHEAD SHARK FOUND IN US WATERS (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  SAVING SHARKS WITH MAGNETS (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

2007 U.S. OCEAN POLICY REPORT CARD
by: Capt_Dave
2008-03-19 05:25:17

2007 U.S. OCEAN POLICY REPORT CARD
  The Joint Ocean Commission Initiative recently released its third annual U.S. Ocean Policy Report Card. The report card assesses the nation's progress in 2007 toward implementing the recommendations of the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy and the Pew Oceans Commission, as well as the actions described in the Administration's U.S. Ocean Action Plan. It also informs policymakers and the public of the critical challenges facing our oceans, while identifying the many opportunities for action. The nation's overall grade given was a C, up from a C- in 2006. The Commission noted progress in two areas, writing that:

States and regions continued to move ocean policy reform forward, making significant strides in improving the management of coastal and ocean resources, and proving that Americans value the economic, environmental, and security benefits of our ocean, coastal, and Great Lakes waters.

U.S. ratification of the Law of the Sea Convention gained significant momentum due to support from the Bush Administration, action in the Senate, and the efforts of a diverse coalition of industry, military, and environmental leaders. Securing Senate approval of the Convention will require strong support from President Bush to ensure that the important national security, economic, and environmental interests that the treaty provides are realized. 

Source: Joint Ocean Commission Initiative, 27 February 2008
http://www.jointoceancommission.org/

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Recreational Fishing Alliance

Recreational Fishing Alliance · Total News: 24 · Total Reads: 24312

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  THE ABSURDITY OF FISHERIES MANAGEMENT (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  THE ABSURDITY OF FISHERIES MANAGEMENT (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  CONGRESS TO BLAME FOR BLACK SEA BASS CLOSURE (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  OBAMA'S FINAL OCEANS PLAN REMAINS UNDER WRAPS (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  TOP EAST COAST TOURNAMENTS TO SUPPORT RFA (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  RFA BLASTS ENVIRONMENTAL DEFENSE FUND FISH FRAUD (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  SEN. SCHUMER ANNOUNCES SENATE MAGNUSON HEARINGS (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  HOUSE VOTES TO STOP NEW CATCH SHARE FUNDING (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  'CATCH SHARE' AMENDMENTS EXPECTED IN HOUSE BILL (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  RFA SOUTHEAST MEMBERS COMMENT ON SAFMC MEETINGS (Capt_Dave)
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Most recent article:

THE ABSURDITY OF FISHERIES MANAGEMENT
by: Capt_Dave
2013-02-11 23:45:19

THE ABSURDITY OF FISHERIES MANAGEMENT

PART 2 - WHEN DOES GOVERNMENT BECOME ACCOUNTABLE?

In our first installment of the Absurdity of Fisheries Management series, the Recreational Fishing Alliance (RFA) shined the spotlight on the "fatally flawed" Marine Recreational Fishing Statistical Surveys (MRFSS) which the Department of Commerce is using today to essentially shut down 'commerce' in the recreational fishing industry.

Regrettably, the National Marine Fisheries Service (NMFS) successfully argued before a U.S. District Court judge in 2011 that Congress didn't actually intend for them to really fix the recreational data collection program by time-certain deadline of 2009. In the words of the Honorable James S. Moody, Jr. who found in favor of the defendant (NMFS), "Nowhere in the MSRA (Magnuson Stevens Reauthorization Act) or its legislative history does Congress indicate its intent, as the Plaintiff argues, for the improved MRFSS to be completely finalized with all phases of the MRIP (Marine Recreational Information Program) fully implemented by January 1, 2009."

Actually, Judge Moody agreed with NMFS that meeting the 2009 deadline for the implementation of recreational data collection improvements would be "unrealistic and impossible," further elaborating that Congress never gave an express meaning of the word "implement."

Thomas Jefferson said, "Laws are made for men of ordinary understanding and should, therefore, be construed by the ordinary rules of common sense. Their meaning is not to be sought for in metaphysical subtleties which may make anything mean everything or nothing at pleasure." But make no mistake, when Congress reauthorized Magnuson in 2006, they were told explicitly what would happen when they phrased their language as they did.

"THE BIGGEST MISTAKE WE CAN MAKE"

Signed into law by President Bush on January 12, 2007, the Magnuson-Stevens Act also changed the requirements to monitoring and adjusting seasonal fishing quotas by requiring any fishery management plan prepared by Council or the Secretary of Commerce to "establish a mechanism for specifying annual catch limits in the plan (including a multiyear plan), implementing regulations, or annual specifications, at a level such that overfishing does not occur in the fishery, including measures to ensure accountability."

The deadline for implementing these new annual catch limits (ACL) was 2010, the year after MRIP was supposed to replace MRFSS.

According to NOAA, an ACL is "the level of annual catch of a fish stock or stock complex that serves as the basis for invoking accountability measures," whereas accountability measures (AM) are the management controls that prevent annual catch limits from being exceeded, which includes future mitigation. In other words, an ACL is not just a quota, it's a rigid numerical limit based on pounds of fish; if the ACL is exceeded or projected to be exceeded in any way, shape or form by the recreational sector, an AM is the punishment that gets meted out.

"Basically this means that if the recreational data collection shows anglers overharvested more of the seasonal quota than we were originally allowed, we'll have to pay that overage back in future quota, a penalty before a new season can even start," said Jim Donofrio, executive director of the Recreational Fishing Alliance (RFA). "Our argument in 2006 in opposition to these ACL's and payback measures is the same today, that fisheries managers cannot meet exact weights and measures required under this scheme by simply using old random survey data."

While commercial fishermen in theory have nearly exact accounting of every pound of fish that's brought back to dock and sold, recreational anglers are monitored using random phone calls and a dockside sampling efforts. Established in the 1970's as a tool to monitor angler trends, MRFSS is still being used today to gather 'effort and participation' data by calling phone listings in coastal phone books coupled with 'catch per angler' statistics gathered at a handful of dockside locations.

"Most of our fishermen have never been called at home nor have they been surveyed at the dock, yet MRFSS is still in place as the tool by which NOAA meets the rigid ACL and AM definitions," Donofrio said. "Of greater concern, as more information comes to light in way of US Fish and Wildlife Service data and state license/registry programs, there is undeniable evidence that MRFSS habitually and significantly overestimates the number anglers," Donofrio continued.

As RFA warned from the beginning, the rush to meet time-certain deadlines as required by federal law was ripe with obstacles. Where the U.S. court system has agreed that the deadlines for NMFS to improve the science and data in coastal fisheries were "unrealistic and impossible," the Department of Commerce along with stakeholders at the regional council level have been given no such flexibility to manage around rigid, hard and fast ACL requirements.

RFA met recently with NMFS staffers at a meeting in Gloucester, MA. When asked directly why the fisheries agency has not been able to integrate the angler registry database into the new recreational data collection efforts as required by law, one high-level NOAA Fisheries policy advisor said "the biggest mistake we can make is moving ahead too quickly."

Back in 2006 when the National Academy of Sciences found the recreational data collection methodologies used by NMFS to be worthless in terms of real-time monitoring, it was determined that the random nature of the survey had "serious flaws in design or implementation and use inadequate analysis methods that need to be addressed immediately." Obviously, the word 'immediately' holds a different sense of urgency for those who work around the Beltway.

"It will never be perfect," said the NOAA official recently of the random survey methodologies, an argument apparently held by our U.S. court system. Though random angler surveys will never meet the rigid requirements of ACLs and AMs, saltwater anglers can sit back and enjoy the ""metaphysical subtleties" of life which our founding fathers warned can mean everything or nothing at all, depending on your perspective.

Because of the complete absurdity of fisheries management and hopeless inadequacy of our federal government, essentially what we've learned in the recreational fishing community is that you will get nothing and you'll like it. But hey, at least we are not rushing into anything!

Next Thursday, February 14th, part 3 in the RFA continuing series on the Absurdity of Fisheries Management will focus on how an inflexible law and time-certain deadlines are forcing anglers to drive off a fisheries cliff at incredible speeds!

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River Herring

River Herring · Total News:· Total Reads: 1506

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  RIVER HERRING (Dawg)

Most recent article:

RIVER HERRING
by: Dawg
2003-12-09 16:04:52

FF-52-2003






PROCLAMATION
RE: RIVER HERRING

Preston P. Pate, Jr., Director, Division of Marine Fisheries, hereby announces that effective at 12:01 A.M., Thursday, January 1, 2004, the following restrictions will apply to the harvest of river herring:

I. SEASON

The river herring season will open in all waters of the state.

A. The river herring season in all areas, excluding the Albemarle Sound Herring Management Area and the Chowan River Herring Management Area, will open with no harvest restrictions and will close at midnight on April 14, 2004.

B. The river herring commercial season in the Albemarle Sound Herring Management Area and the Chowan River Herring Management Area will close when the poundage allocations specified below are reached. Proclamations closing the fisheries will be issued at that time.

C. The river herring season for recreational purposes in the Albemarle Sound Herring Management Area and the Chowan River Herring Management Area will close at midnight on April 14, 2004.

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SC Dept. of Natural Resources

SC Dept. of Natural Resources · Total News: 31 · Total Reads: 23949

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  New South Carolina Saltwater Finfish Regulations (Capt_Tom)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Governor's Cup first round news (Capt_Tom)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  New materials for Georgetown area artificial reefs (Capt_Tom)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  DNR Marine Resources director elected vice chair of Atlantic Fisheries group (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  DNR biologists complete red drum stocking for 2006 (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Deep-sea research produces reef maps (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  GOVERNOR'S CUP BILLFISHING SERIES ANNOUNCES CHANGES, 2007 SCHEDULE (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Ocean Exploration Research Underway (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  DNR to hold public meetings focusing on marine resources (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Home Runâ€â (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

New South Carolina Saltwater Finfish Regulations
by: Capt_Tom
2007-06-16 16:23:34

Newly Regulated Finfish Species

New fisheries laws adding or changing catch limits and retention sizes on a number of recreationally important saltwater finfish species in South Carolina have been passed by the SC General Assembly and are now in place.

The new laws, effective June 15, concern the harvest of black drum, weakfish, hardhead and gafftopsail saltwater catfish, red drum, spotted seatrout, flounder, black seabass, and dolphin. These new state fisheries laws were adopted primarily to support a proactive and precautionary approach in natural resources management to help deal with increasing fishing pressures and environmental stresses placed on South Carolina’s marine finfish resources associated with coastal growth and development.

Details of the new laws are as follows:

Species of Fish Bag Limit Size Limit
Black Drum 5 per person per day Must be 14 inches Total Length or greater and equal to or less than 27 inches Total Length
Weakfish (summer trout; gray trout) 10 per person per day 12 inch Total Length minimum
Hardhead and Gafftopsail saltwater catfish Possession is prohibited  
Red Drum (spot tailed bass; redfish) 3 per person per day Must be 15 inches Total Length or greater, and equal to or less than 23 inches Total Length maximum
Spotted Seatrout (winter trout; speckled trout) 10 per person per day 14 inch Total Length minimum
Flounder (southern flounder; summer flounder; gulf flounder) 20 per person per day, not to exceed 40 per BOAT per day 14 inch Total Length minimum
Black Seabass (blackfish) Made state regulations mimic federal regulations
Federal - 15 per person per day
12 inch Total Length minimum
Dolphin (mahi) Made state regulations mimic federal regulations
Federal - 10 per person per day, 60 per boat per day (headboats excluded from boat limit)
No size limit

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SC Sea Grant

SC Sea Grant · Total News:· Total Reads: 3666

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Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  South Carolina Department of Natural Resources biologists released about 300 juv (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  South Carolina Sea Grant Consortium (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Novel Model Helps Manage a Sustainable Blue Crab Fishery (Dawg)

Most recent article:

South Carolina Department of Natural Resources biologists released about 300 juv
by: Dawg
2006-05-18 06:40:56

South Carolina Department of Natural Resources biologists released about 300 juvenile cobia into the Port Royal Sound May 3.

The cobia, averaging a size of about 3 pounds and 21 inches long, were externally marked with tags that anglers can easily observe and report to the S.C. Department of Natural Resources (DNR) toll-free fish tag reporting line, 1-888- TAGS-4-SC (1-888- 824-7472).

Already, 10 recaptures from this release have been reported to the toll-free number—five were caught near the Trask Landing where they were initially released, and five were reported from further out in the Port Royal Sound.

"We hope the return rate of anglers calling to report the tags will provide us with additional information about this species," said Wally Jenkins, DNR biologist. "Recapture rates from previously tagged and released cobia have suggested that as they mature, they return to the Port Royal Sound Estuary. We want to determine what is unique about the estuary for this species."

For more information on the cobia release, contact Jenkins at JenkinsW@dnr.sc.gov.

The DNR’s award-winning Waddell Mariculture Center is world renowned for its milestone achievements in aquaculture and fisheries enhancement. This release event was the fifth in a series of releases, dating back to October 2001, of medium-sized (12 inches) and larger-sized (21 inches) externally marked cobia. The fish released this month were spawned in captivity last summer and raised in tanks at the Waddell Mariculture Center over the winter. Releases of 93 similar sized fish last spring yielded a recapture rate of seven percent exclusively from anglers fishing in the Port Royal Sound estuary during summer 2005. Biologists expect to see similar or higher rates of return from this release.

"The objective of the cobia releases is to learn about the movements and habitat preferences of this important species," Jenkins said. "To date, tag returns have indicated that juvenile fish remain in this estuary all summer and then move into the ocean and head south for the winter."

Fish that have been released previously have been reported from as far south as Juno Beach, Fla., during their winter migration. Also, one 12-inch fish from a group released in fall 2001 was recaptured last spring in Port Royal Sound, measuring 47 inches in total length and weighing 40 pounds. Al Stokes, DNR biologist and Waddell Mariculture Center manager, said: "Because we have a spawning date and a recapture date for this fish, it becomes a measuring tool for comparing growth patterns for the species as a whole." The notable recapture also indicates that as fish mature they return to the Port Royal Sound estuary to feed before spawning.

The data supports the hypothesis that the Port Royal Sound is an important nursery and spawning area for Atlantic Coast cobia and that conserving this habitat is essential to the long-term health of the fishery, according to Jenkins.

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Scup

Scup · Total News:· Total Reads: 2843

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  SCUP (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend   SCUP (Dawg)

Most recent article:

SCUP
by: Dawg
2003-12-31 12:24:05

FF-61-2003



PROCLAMATION

RE: SCUP

Preston P. Pate, Jr., Director, Division of Marine Fisheries, hereby announces that effective at 9:00 A.M., Friday, January 2, 2004, the following restrictions will apply to the commercial scup fishery in the Atlantic Ocean north of Cape Hatteras (35° 15' N. Latitude):

I. HARVEST LIMITS

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Sea Grant of North Carolina

Sea Grant of North Carolina · Total News: 74 · Total Reads: 47434

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Marine Fisheries Forum Set for March 18 (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  2006 Workshop on Bluefin Tuna Set for Nov. 17 (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  National Forum Slated to Address Water Access Issues: Market Forces Squeezing Ou (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  North Carolina Students Spend Summer with NOAA on Hollings Scholarship (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NC Sea Grant is providing the following news release as a courtesy to the Nation (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Sea Grant Expert Gives Tips On Storm-Resistant Construction (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Morehead Cityâ€ââ₠(Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Blue Crab Research Grants Awarded (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Rocky Branch Restoration Highlights Urban Water Flow to the Coast (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Rocky Branch Restoration Highlights Urban Water Flow to the Coast (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

Marine Fisheries Forum Set for March 18
by: Capt_Dave
2008-03-14 06:30:22

Marine Fisheries Forum Set for March 18

 

Contact:
Katie Mosher 919/515-9069
Heather Ward 919/515-1092

 

North Carolina Sea Grant, the N.C. Marine Fisheries Commission (MFC) and the N.C. Division of Marine Fisheries (DMF) are co-sponsoring the third Marine Fisheries Forum at the New Bern Riverfront Convention Center on March 18.  MFC advisors, the public, students, and anyone interested in cutting-edge fisheries research are encouraged to attend. 

In the morning session, B.J. Copeland, MFC vice chairman, will moderate a panel discussion on coastal habitat protection plans, water quality indicators, Inner Banks development, State of the Coast trends, and future research needs. 

In the afternoon, researchers, receiving support through the N.C. Fishery Resource Grant (FRG) and N.C. Blue Crab Research Program (BCRP) will present findings from recent projects. 

FRG presenters include: 

· Charles Van Salisbury and Blake Price.  Low Profile Gillnet Testing in the Deepwater Region of Pamlico Sound, North Carolina.

· Tom Burgess and Paul Rudershausen.  Determination of Catch Rates and Discard Mortality by Pot Type for the Black Sea Bass Commercial Pot Fishery

· Chris Butler and Jeff Buckel. Atlantic Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus) Feeding Ecology and Potential Ecosystem Effects During Winter in NC Waters.

BCRP presenters include:

· Naomi Avissar, Ronnie Cahoon, Virginia Cahoon, and Larry Crowder. Testing a New Technique for Reducing Sea Turtle Damage to Crab Pots.

· Joseph Luczkovich, Terry West, and Mark Brinson. Analysis of Potential Effects on Land Cover Change on Blue Crab (Callinectes sapidus) Populations in Primary Nursery Areas.

· Teresa Thorpe, and Tom Likos. Evaluation of Terrapin Excluder Devices on Blue Crab (Callinectes sapidus) Pots, Effects on Diamondback Terrapin (Malaclemys terrapin) Bycatch and Target Catch Efficiency.

· Jason Hassell and Dinah Hassell. Minimizing Pot Loss and Retrieval of Lost Pots.

· Ruth McDowell, M. Zachary Darnell and Daniel Rittschof. Effects of Temperature and Body Size on Clutch Production in the Blue Crab, (Callinectes sapidus).

FRG and BCRP are funded by the N.C. General Assembly and administered by Sea Grant.  Both programs combine common-sense knowledge from members of local fishing communities with the analytical skills of university researchers. 

The forum is free.  Registration begins at 8 a.m.  For more information, contact Sea Grant extension specialists Bob Hines at rjhines@ncsu.edu, 252/222-6312; or Marc Turano at marc_turano@ncsu.edu, 919/513-0122. 

Details also are available online at www.ncseagrant.org under “About NCSG.”  Click on “Events Calendar.” 

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Sea Turtle News

Sea Turtle News · Total News:· Total Reads: 10114

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Public Outraged at Assault on Sea Turtle Protections (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  New Fishing Hooks Save Sea Turtles (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Loggerhead Turtles Released at Sebastian Inlet State Park (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Costa Rica Passes Long Awaited Fisheries Law (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Prominent Scientists Join Call For UN Moratorium on Longline Fishing (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Fishing Gear a Death Trap for Sea Turtles (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  "Last Journey for the Leatherback?" to be screened at NYC Conference (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  New Documentary Film Sounds Alarm About the Threat of Extinction to Sea Turtles (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Commission Responds to Public Comments that More Action to Save Sea Turtles are (Dawg)

Most recent article:

Public Outraged at Assault on Sea Turtle Protections
by: Dawg
2006-03-03 04:16:33

Public Outraged at Assault on Sea Turtle Protections
Public Comments Favoring Protections Received by Government Number 2,200 to 1

Public comments received by the Pacific Fisheries Management Council about its March 9th final vote to allow drift gillnets, also known as "curtains of death," and longlines back into vast protected areas along the Pacific Coast expresses overwhelming public opposition to industry efforts to gut successful conservation measures that protected critically endangered leatherback sea turtles. By the close of the February 15th public comment period, the Council received comments at a ratio of about 2,200 to 1 not to proceed with the expansion of these two destructive fishing practices that injure and kill large numbers of sea turtles, marine mammals, seabirds and valuable non-target fish. In addition, a unique coalition of ten recreational fishing, animal welfare and marine conservation groups with about 9 million members are working to oppose the measure.

"It's time for the Council and NOAA Fisheries to listen to the public and enforce their mandate to protect the public interest" said Robert Ovetz, Ph.D., Save the Leatherback Campaign Coordinator with the Sea Turtle Restoration Project, "And the public interest is keeping leatherback sea turtles and other marine species from going extinct and prevent overfishing."

The United Nations banned driftnets on the high seas in 1991 and the US has followed with recent closures to large areas in US waters including the time and area closures along the Pacific. Since 2001, areas north of Point Conception to an intersect with the Oregon coast have been closed to drift gillnet fishing from August 15th through November 15th in order to protect endangered leatherback and loggerhead sea turtles. During the past three years of this closure, this fishery, which targets swordfish with drift gillnet gear, has had no recorded takes of leatherback sea turtles. Longline fishing, which is also one of the main threats to leatherback sea turtles, was banned along the US West Coast in 2004.

Since 2002, 64 dolphins, whales, seals and sea lions have been killed by the drift gillnet fishery in the West Coast areas still open to gillnetting. Additionally, seabirds including Northern fulmars and Cassin's auklet have been injured or killed.

The proposed exemption would allow as many as two thirds of the remaining 36 drift-gillnet vessels and between 71 and 131 longline vessels into the closed areas.


"Drift-gillnet and longlines are subsidized unprofitable industries looking for a hand-out at the expense of endangered species like leatherback sea turtles, humpback whales and sharks. The public has spoken. It's time for the government to listen," added Ovetz.

Resources:
• The scientist letter can be found at:
http://www.seaturtles.org/pdf/___Scient.ltr.PFMC.final.pdf
• The NGO coalition letter can be found at:
http://www.seaturtles.org/pdf/_NGO.letter.2.final.pdf
• For information about the Pacific Fisheries Management Council meeting go to: http://www.pcouncil.org/bb/2005/bb1105.html
• For a review copy of the Sea Turtle Restoration Project's new documentary film Last Journey for the Leatherback? contact Robert Ovetz, Ph.D.

For more information, contact:
Robert Ovetz, Ph.D.
(415) 488-0370 x 106
robert@seaturtles.org

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Shad

Shad · Total News:· Total Reads: 1637

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  AMERICAN SHAD-ATLANTIC OCEAN (Dawg)

Most recent article:

AMERICAN SHAD-ATLANTIC OCEAN
by: Dawg
2003-12-09 16:04:27

FF-53-2003





PROCLAMATION

RE: AMERICAN SHAD-ATLANTIC OCEAN

Preston P. Pate, Jr., Director, Division of Marine Fisheries, hereby announces that effective at 6:00 A.M., Thursday, January 1, 2004, the following restrictions will apply to the taking of American shad in the Atlantic Ocean:

SEASON
The harvest of American shad by commercial fishing operations will open.

HARVEST AREAS
There are two geographic zones in the Atlantic Ocean and each zone has a separate harvest allocation. One zone is from Ocracoke Inlet north to the North Carolina -Virginia state line. The other zone is from Ocracoke Inlet south to the North Carolina-South Carolina state line.

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SHELLFISH

SHELLFISH · Total News: 36 · Total Reads: 34935

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  U.S. starts collecting anti-dumping shrimp taxes (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  U.S. Antidumping Calculations Are Logical and Legal (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Wal-Mart's domestic shrimp sales jump 60% (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Big shrimp-farming potential from South Carolina research (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Big shrimp-farming potential from South Carolina research (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  August shrimp exports to U.S. drop 30 percent (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  South Carolina scientists trawl for DNA as new lab searches for answers on illne (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Shrimp market affected by dumping decision (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Western Kentucky couple raising saltwater shrimp in indoor tanks (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  SSA Responds to Political Efforts against Shrimp Petitions (Dawg)
· More -->

Most recent article:

U.S. starts collecting anti-dumping shrimp taxes
by: Dawg
2005-02-27 04:17:30

U.S. starts collecting anti-dumping shrimp taxes

The U.S. Government has ordered its customs office to start collecting anti-dumping tariffs on shrimp imports from Vietnam and five other countries, said the Vietnamese seafood business association on Tuesday.

The U.S. Customs and Border Protection have been told to begin collecting a US$2.3 billion deposit from American seafood importers buying frozen shrimps from Vietnam and five other countries, said the Vietnam Association of Seafood Exporters and Producers (
Vasep ).

Vietnam, Brazil, China, Ecuador, India and Thailand were charged with anti-dumping tariffs late last year for selling shrimp to the U.S. at below-market prices.

The duties will be applicable for two years, the Vasep said. After that, the U.S. Government will reconsider shrimp sales and make changes accordingly on the tax rates, said the association added.

Earlier on Jan. 26, the U.S. Department of Commerce (DoC) decided to
raise tariffs on Vietnam's frozen shrimps by 0.17 to 0.25% from its December rulings.

In December, the DoC upheld the imposition of penalty taxes on shrimp imports from Vietnam and slapped anti-dumping tariffs ranging from 4.13 to 25.76%.

On Jan. 7, the quasi-judicial U.S. International Trade Commission issued a ruling that support the DoC's decision, paving the way for the taxes to take effect.

The Vasep has repeatedly said that Vietnamese producers did not dump shrimp in the American market and that any tariff rates were unfair and unreasonable.

Vietnam Style

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South Atlantic Fishery Management Counci

South Atlantic Fishery Management Counci · Total News: 109 · Total Reads: 88724

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend   NOAA Fisheries Seeks Public Comment on Proposed Actions to Modify Catch Limits (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Recreational Harvest of the Porgy Complex in South Atlantic Waters Will Close on (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  2014 Commercial and Recreational Red Snapper Fishing Seasons in the South Atlant (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Recreational Harvest of Golden Tilefish and Snowy Grouper Closing June 7, 2014 ( (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Commercial Harvest of Red Porgy and Vermilion Snapper in South Atlantic Waters C (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Federal Fishery Managers Decide Against Requirement for Vessel Monitoring System (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Commercial Harvest of Vermilion Snapper in South Atlantic Waters Will Close on F (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Public Scoping and Hearings for Snapper Grouper Species, Dolphin and Wahoo Begin (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Council Recognizes Law Enforcement Officer of the Year (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Data Collection Improvements for Commercial and For-Hire (Charter) Fishermen (Capt_Dave)
· More -->

Most recent article:

NOAA Fisheries Seeks Public Comment on Proposed Actions to Modify Catch Limits
by: Capt_Dave
2014-12-08 14:40:09

 NOAA Fisheries Seeks Public Comment on Proposed Actions to Modify Catch Limits for Snapper-Grouper Species and Gray Triggerfish Management Measures
 
NOAA Fisheries is seeking public comment on Amendment 29 to the Fishery Management Plan for the Snapper-Grouper Fishery of the South Atlantic Region (Amendment 29). NOAA Fisheries is also seeking public comment on the proposed rule to implement the management measures in the amendment. Amendment 29 proposes to:

    Update the South Atlantic Fishery Management Council's (Council) acceptable biological catch control rule for determining catch levels of unassessed species.
    Adjust the acceptable biological catch value for 14 unassessed snapper-grouper species.
    Revise the annual catch limits for three species complexes and four snapper-grouper species.
    Establish a minimum size limit for gray triggerfish in federal waters off North Carolina, South Carolina, and Georgia for both the commercial and recreational sectors.
    Revise the commercial and recreational minimum size limit for gray triggerfish off the east coast of Florida.
    Establish a commercial split season for gray triggerfish.
    Establish commercial trip limits for gray triggerfish.

The Council has submitted Amendment 29 to NOAA Fisheries for review, approval, and implementation. The Notice of Availability for Amendment 29 published in the Federal Register on November 23, 2014 (79 FR 69819), and the comment period ends on January 23, 2015. The proposed rule published in the Federal Register on December 8, 2014 (79 FR 72567) and the comment period ends on January 7, 2015. All comments specifically directed toward the amendment or the rule will be addressed in the final rule.

For more information on Amendment 29, please visit the NOAA Fisheries Southeast Regional Office Web site at:

http://sero.nmfs.noaa.gov/sustainable_fisheries/s_atl/sg/2014/am29/index.html. An electronic version of the amendment and proposed rule is available at that Web site or from the e-rulemaking portal, www.regulations.gov.

How to Submit Comments

You may submit comments by the following methods:

    Electronic Submission: Submit all electronic public comments via the Federal e-Rulemaking Portal. Go to http://www.regulations.gov/#!docketDetail;D=NOAA-NMFS-2014-0132 click the "Comment Now!" icon, complete the required fields, and enter or attach your comments.
    Mail: NOAA Fisheries

               Southeast Regional Office

               Sustainable Fisheries Division

               c/o Karla Gore

               263 13th Avenue South

               St. Petersburg, Florida 3370-5505


NOAA Fisheries will accept anonymous comments. Attachments to electronic comments will be accepted in Microsoft Word, Excel, WordPerfect, or Adobe PDF file formats only. Comments received through means not specified in this bulletin may not be considered.

More Information

For more information on Amendment 29, please click on this link to the Frequently Asked Questions found at: http://sero.nmfs.noaa.gov/sustainable_fisheries/s_atl/sg/2014/am29/index.html.  This bulletin serves as a Small Entity Compliance Guide, complying with section 212 of the Small Business Regulatory Enforcement Fairness Act of 1996.

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Striped Bass

Striped Bass · Total News:· Total Reads: 11526

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  STRIPED BASS SEASON -GILL NETS : ATLANTIC OCEAN (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  STRIPED BASS SEASON - COMMERCIAL FISHING OPERATIONS- CAPE FEAR RIVER (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  PROCLAMATION-STRIPED BASS SEASON - COMMERCIAL FISHING OPERATIONS (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  STRIPED BASS SEASON - COMMERCIAL FISHING OPERATIONS - (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  STRIPED BASS RECREATIONAL SEASON - ALBEMARLE SOUND MANAGEMENT AREA (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  STRIPED BASS SEASON -GILL NETS : ATLANTIC OCEAN (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  RE: STRIPED BASS RECREATIONAL SEASON (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  STRIPED BASS MEETINGS TO BE HELD NOV. 24 and 25 (Dawg)

Most recent article:

STRIPED BASS SEASON -GILL NETS : ATLANTIC OCEAN
by: Dawg
2004-01-08 12:19:44

FF-3-2004

PROCLAMATION

RE: STRIPED BASS SEASON -GILL NETS : ATLANTIC OCEAN


Preston P. Pate, Jr., Director, Division of Marine Fisheries, hereby announces that effective at 8:00 P.M., Monday, January 12, 2004 the following restrictions will apply to the harvest of striped bass with gill nets in the Atlantic Ocean waters of North Carolina.


I. SEASON CLOSURE


The Atlantic Ocean gill net season for striped bass WILL CLOSE due to the harvest allocation being met.

II. GENERAL INFORMATION

A. This proclamation is issued under the authority of G.S. 113-170.4; 113-170.5;113-182; 113-221(e); 143B-289.52; and N.C. Marine Fisheries Rules 15A NCAC 3H .0103, 3M .0201 and 3M.0204.

B. It is unlawful to violate the provisions of any proclamation issued by the Director under his delegated authority per 15A NCAC 3H .0103.

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Tag A Giant

Tag A Giant · Total News:· Total Reads: 2773

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Blue Marlin Movements Tracked with Satellite Tags (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Tag-A-Giant in Carolina January 2005 (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  TAG-A-Giant is officially over in North Carolina (Dawg)

Most recent article:

Blue Marlin Movements Tracked with Satellite Tags
by: Dawg
2006-03-07 03:47:59

Blue Marlin Movements Tracked with Satellite Tags

This unique research effort is being undertaken by the TRCC scientists in cooperation with charter boat captains and recreational anglers, to monitor the movements, release survival parameters and water temperature preferences of Pacific blue marlin using the most recent and sophisticated satellite tagging and game fish catch-and-release technologies.

The Project
Release of live billfishes, in both recreational and commercial fisheries, is a common tool used to reduce billfish landings and promote conservation.

Tag-A-Billfish will utilize pop-up satellite archival tags to examine post-release survivorship and gather much needed information about the movements of blue marlin. Information on oceanic movements of the fish will be correlated with oceanographic features (sea surface temperature, ocean color, and currents) to provide new insight into one of the planet’s least understood pelagic fish.

Survivorship of billfishes after tag and release is not well documented and is critical information for assessing the costs and benefits of the practice for marlin caught in recreational and commercial fisheries. The objectives of this project are to place satellite tags on blue marlin and release them under the best possible condition by utilizing heavy tackle and experienced anglers to assist the scientists.

Detailed records of depth, temperature and movements will be examined for all fish. The tags will provide histogram summaries of depth and temperature preferences, and light data from which longitude and latitude can be estimated. The preference of blue marlin for surface waters will make light based geo-location extremely feasible.

We intend to deploy pop-up satellite archival tags on blue marlin in the Atlantic and Pacific. If the response from community based sponsorship of tags is favorable, we will be able to increase in the number of short and long term tags deployed.

Angler and Scientists have Cooperated for Over 40 Years to Tag and Release Gamefish
Cooperative tagging programs mounted by various national and private organizations over the last 40 years have been spectacularly successful not only in generating information about the movements of game fish, their age and growth, but also in building partnerships between the angling and scientific communities.

In Hawaii there is a 25-year history of research in association with the Pacific Ocean Research Foundation (PORF), which has established an excellent working relationship with the recreational anglers of Kona, Hawaii. Working together, over forty scientific publications on blue marlin have been published. Similar efforts have been achieved in the Atlantic with cooperative tagging occurring along the Eastern US seaboard especially in the Carolinas, in Madeira and off Bermuda. This cooperative effort of scientists and fishers has led to a large increase in our knowledge about blue marlin.

The scientists from the Tuna Research and Conservation Center (TRCC) together with PORF scientists have worked for two decades in Kona with the blue marlin fishery. We have substantial links with the recreational marlin fishery in Hawaii through Captain Rick Gaffney and Sue Vermillion and are looking to build a community integrated scientific research program.

TAG-A-BILLFISH Research Plan

The Technology
Recent technological advances in wildlife telemetry provide our team with new tools to directly examine behavior, short and long-term movement patterns and the global distribution of large pelagic fish. The successful implementation of both the pop-up satellite and archival tag technology has provided marine researchers with powerful new methodologies for studying large pelagic vertebrates.

Research Locations

One of the most active locations for research on pelagic fishes has been the prolific waters of the Kona coast, where calm, deep-water, close to shore, helps make this location an ideal study site. Over the past two decades, the PORF laboratory of Kona, Hawaii has accumulated behavioral, physiological and genetic data on blue marlin and tuna species in an effort to better understand the biology of these species. Many facets of marlin biology including research on reproduction, feeding behavior, local movements recorded via acoustic tracking, and physiological stress have been examined by PORF scientists over the past twenty plus years.

The success of research in Kona has in part been due to a close working relationship developed between the recreational fishing community and research scientists. This co-operative spirit has been nurtured by a culture in the Hawaiian Islands that respects the recreational troll fishery, and its associated tourist dollars as a valuable contribution to the local Hawaiian economy. The presence of this cooperative relationship between fishers and scientists provides the societal context, in parallel with the unique coastal oceanography, within which to conduct sophisticated scientific studies on pelagic game fish. The principal investigators are long established members of this co-operative research association and will implement the project in this working environment.

In the Atlantic Mr. Stuart Campbell has pioneered using pop-up satellite tags in Madeira, Portugal and The Canary Islands. Once again, in 2000, pop-up satellite tags were placed on large blue marlin for durations up to 1 year.

Tag and Release Ethic

In the past decade, sport fishermen have strongly supported the tag and release of blue marlin. The release ethic was developed in response to the over-fishing of many marine resources.

In 1997, the International Commission for the Conservation of Atlantic Tunas (ICCAT) adopted its first-ever-international recommendations for billfish conservation calling for reductions in blue marlin landings. The recommendation called upon both commercial and recreational fishers to reduce fishing effort and billfish landings and in effect promotes release of the fish. The recommendations follow recent assessments, which indicate the Atlantic blue marlin stocks are in a decline. U.S. fisheries operating in Atlantic waters comply with ICCAT recommendations and currently release most live marlin.

In the Pacific, blue marlin is also caught incidentally on tuna and swordfish longlines and is sometimes released. Tag and release has been prominent among recreational fishers throughout the Pacific (led by Australia and New Zealand fishers) and more recently, the Kona recreational fishery has begun to emerge as a proponent of the tag and release of blue marlin.

Survival of Tagged and Released Marlin

While release is often argued to be an effective management tool for reducing mortality, it is not certain how well tagged and released billfish survive. Survivorship studies assessing the ability of blue marlin to recover from capture on commercial and recreational fishing gear and subsequent release are needed to discern the effectiveness of live release in reducing overall mortality. Our will provide short and long term data on blue marlin caught on recreational gear under best possible tag and release conditions. Similar studies should be conducted on commercial gear to compare results.

Migrations

Our pop-up satellite tagging program will provide knowledge of blue marlin behavior and migratory routes throughout the Pacific Ocean basin. Previous Blue Marlin Tracking Research [link to Previous Research] demonstrated remarkable movements from both Kona and Madeira releases. One fish travelled 3000nm in 90 days. Long-term data records on distribution and movement patterns in relationship to environmental parameters are generally unknown and are required for development of international management plans. Our current understanding of the migrations and movement patterns of blue marlin are incomplete because of the inherent difficulties of studying open ocean fishes and historical lack of appropriate tools. The newest generation of pop-up archival tags have been successfully field-tested and are being purpose-built by Wildlife Computers for these studies.

Significance of Tag-A-Billfish for the Future

The increasing pressure that is being brought to bear on ocean resources around the world, means that we must obtain the data upon which proper management of these precious fisheries depends. To maintain strong recreational fisheries for blue marlin it will be increasingly important to demonstrate that blue marlin require international cooperation for their proper management. Pop-up satellite tagging has the potential to provide information on detailed movements, which can be related to remote oceanographic imagery of surface temperatures and oceanic productivity. Such data will provide the first spatial and temporal series on how and why blue marlin move throughout the Pacific basin.revious Blue Marlin Tracking Research

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The Angry Fisherman

The Angry Fisherman · Total News:· Total Reads: 6785

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  THE ANGRY FISHERMAN (Capt_Dave)

Most recent article:

THE ANGRY FISHERMAN
by: Capt_Dave
2009-04-14 17:42:13

THE ANGRY FISHERMAN

 


 

THE ANGRY FISHERMAN and its supporters are in total support of H918, the
Coastal Game Fish Act Bill which is currently in the NC House of Representatives
for consideration. This bill will give “Game Fish” protection to the Spotted Sea
Trout and the Red Drum, and is long overdue here in North Carolina! We also
support the Primary Sponsors of this bill, Representative Carolyn Justice, Pender
and New Hanover Counties, and Representative Paul Luebke, Durham County.
Recent attacks on the character of Rep. Justice by Sean McKeon, paid lobbyist and
spokesman for the commercial fishing industry and the NCFA, are slanderous and
should be retracted immediately! Only 11,063 pounds of Speckled Trout were
reported sold in New Hanover and Pender Counties combined in 2008, clearly
pointing out the scathing, false statement from McKeon that “She’s a coastal
rep acting to destroy many of her own constituents’ livelihoods”.
Quite the contrary, she is representing her constituents with the greatest of
courage in her efforts to guarantee the future of these two fish for the
greater good of New Hanover County and Pender County residents. The
economic impacts of these 2 fish as “Sport Fish” to the coastal communities
outweigh the values they bring to a fish market by millions of dollars!
NOAA studies recently released showed that the NC saltwater recreational
angler spent $2.5 Billion with NC businesses in 2006, generated over $780
Million in salaries and wages to NC workers, and helped support over 23,700
jobs here in NC. Our question to Mr. McKeon is this, how much money did
the commercial fishing industry put into the NC economy in 2006? How
much salaries and wages were created by the commercial fishing industry in
2006, and how many jobs did the industry you are paid to represent provide
for NC workers?
Mr. McKeon is paid to say what he says. Who knows what he really believes?
His efforts are well funded by the NCFA. His income is paid directly from the
total sales of seafood by the members of the NCFA. The more they harvest
and sell, the more he makes! When all the fish are gone, Mr. McKeon will
have to find another industry to spew his lies for!
We believe it is “high time” that someone stood up to the commercially
stacked Marine Fisheries Commission and a select few politicians that feed at
the commercial fishing trough. The Angry Fisherman is 20,000 active and
supportive members. There are NO paid officials nor are any members
doing this for any reason other than to ensure that future generations will
have the opportunity to enjoy this incredible resource. If change does not
happen, then this State faces the extinction of numerous animals and fish
simply for the benefit of a few.
The Angry Fisherman
John M. Hislop

THE ANGRY FISHERMAN

Press Release, April 13, 2009

 

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The Joint Ocean Commission Initiative

The Joint Ocean Commission Initiative · Total News:· Total Reads: 1789

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Key Senators Agree to Take Action As Ocean Crisis Worsens (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Statement of the Joint Ocean Commission Initiative on President BushÃà (Dawg)

Most recent article:

Key Senators Agree to Take Action As Ocean Crisis Worsens
by: Dawg
2006-07-03 07:51:18

Key Senators Agree to Take Action As Ocean Crisis Worsens

Joint Ocean Commission Responds to Senate Request To Develop Congressional Priority Plan

From Sea to Shining Sea:
Priorities for Ocean Policy Reform

Washington, DC – A bipartisan group of ten influential Senators have agreed to take action on comprehensive reform of the nation’s ocean policy as the problems with our troubled seas continue to grow worse. A national ocean policy action plan for Congress, From Sea to Shining Sea: Priorities for Ocean Policy Reform, developed at the Senators’ request, was delivered to Capitol Hill today by the Joint Ocean Commission Initiative and will serve as a guide for developing legislation and funding high-priority programs.

The action plan responds to the Senators’ request to identify the most urgent priorities for congressional action to protect, restore, and maintain the marine ecosystem. The plan includes the top ten steps Congress should take to address the most pressing challenges, the highest funding priorities, and the most important changes to federal laws and the budget process to establish a more effective and integrated ocean policy.

From Sea to Shining Sea calls for Congress to adopt a statement of national ocean policy that acknowledges in legislation the importance of oceans to the nation’s economic and ecological health and establishes a framework for all other ocean legislation. Among the pressing priorities:

•Establishing a strengthened National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) in law and working with the Bush Administration to improve federal agency coordination on ocean and coastal issues;

•Enacting legislation to create incentives for ecosystem-based management that builds upon existing and emerging regional efforts to involve federal, state, tribal, and local governments, as well as the private sector, nongovernmental organizations, and academic institutions; and

•Reauthorizing an improved Magnuson-Stevens Fishery Conservation and Management Act that relies more strongly on science to guide management actions to ensure the long-term sustainability of U.S. fisheries.

"Three years ago the Pew Oceans Commission and the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy sounded the alarm on the state of our oceans. While we did a good job helping everyone understand that oceans and coasts are in serious trouble, we have been unable to transform that insight into any sustained momentum to develop and implement a new framework for ocean policy," said Leon E. Panetta, Joint Initiative co-chair.

"While the crisis continues to intensify, there has been limited progress over the last few years towards instituting the broad policy and institutional changes called for the by Commissions," he added.

In addition, the report urges Congress to:

•Enact ocean and coastal legislation that has made significant progress through the legislative process in the 109th Congress;

•Incorporate ocean-related science and education into the new national innovation and competitiveness initiative, capitalizing on the growing economic potential associated with our oceans and the attraction they hold for students;

•Enact legislation to authorize and fund the Integrated Ocean Observing System;

•Accede to the United Nations Convention on the Law of the Sea, allowing the U.S. to share its expertise, capitalize on economic opportunities, and protect is sovereign interests;

•Establish an Ocean Trust Fund in the U.S. Treasury as a dedicated source of funds for improved management and understanding of ocean and coastal resources by the federal and state governments; and

•Secure additional funding to support management, science, and education programs that are the foundation of robust national ocean policy.

"We must be more aggressive if we hope to repair and protect the oceans and coasts, vital components of our national security, economic security, food security, recreation, and environmental health," said William Ruckelshaus, Joint Initiative member. "It’s no overstatement to say that oceans are essential to human survival. They are responsible for the air we breathe, and support a significant portion of our economy, yet we continue to destroy their life-sustaining capacity and compromise their ability to provide goods and services we’ve come to rely upon."

"There is really no dispute about the nature and severity of the threats confronting the oceans," said Panetta. "We heard from hundreds of citizens, scientists, industry groups, environmental organizations, and elected officials and found broad consensus on the problems, which are outlined in From Sea to Shining Sea." Among these are:

•Fragmented laws, confusing and overlapping jurisdiction, and the absence of a coherent national ocean policy.

•A lack of coordinated federal support for emerging regional ocean and coastal governance initiatives.

•Overexploited fisheries, poor water quality and the loss of critical habitat.

•A dearth of U.S. leadership in international ocean and coastal forums.

•Dwindling U.S. investment in ocean and coastal research, science, and education.

•Inadequate funding for federal agencies and for nonfederal partners at the regional, state, and local level.

The Joint Ocean Commission Initiative is a collaborative effort of the U.S. Commission on Ocean Policy and Pew Oceans Commission to catalyze ocean policy reform. The Initiative is guided by a ten-member Task Force, five from each Commission, and led by Admiral James D. Watkins and the Honorable Leon E. Panetta, chairs of the U.S. Commission and Pew Commission, respectively. The primary goal of the Joint Ocean Commission Initiative is to accelerate the pace of change that results in meaningful ocean policy reform.

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Topsail Offshore Fishing Club

Topsail Offshore Fishing Club · Total News:· Total Reads: 900

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  FISH TALES (Dawg)

Most recent article:

FISH TALES
by: Dawg
2006-01-16 05:15:30

FISH TALES
Club member Ollie Angel passed away Jan. 3, 2006. Ollie was diagnosed with cancer this past February. I have never seen anyone with a more positive outlook than Ollie in dealing with his illness. He told me one of the things he looked most forward to was getting back out on the ocean and fishing again. His beach neighbors will miss him. Please let his family know we are thinking about them during this time. His family’s address is:

Mrs. Kay Angel
3214 Kendale Drive
Sanford, NC 27332

New Member:
Our newest member Marshall Ray Goller was born Dec. 6, 2005. Randy & Sandra’s new son arrived a couple of weeks early. Randy will have his own fishing team before long. All are doing well.

Inlet Report:
I haven’t been out myself, but a neighbor told me he went out before Christmas just cruising and bass fishing on a calm day. He said it was breaking all the way across on low tide. He came back in a few hours later while the tide was coming in and hit bottom on the bar. Be careful next time you head that way.

Don’t forget to send E-mail or call if you have some fishy information you want in the newsletter. Inlet changes will be on everyone’s mind. If you hear anything on this, please let me know. I will be writing the regular monthly letter from this point on and sending changes to Benny for website every week. If you have pictures, send them to Benny Herring at bennyh(at)tofc.com, along with the story. He does a much better job with computers!

Good Fishing,

Johnnie D. Sheppard (Reel Living)
PO Box 217
Pink Hill, NC 28572
Home 252-568-3591
Work 252-568-4188
Beach 910-328-3135
e-mail
sheppard(at)eastlink.net

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U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service

U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service · Total News: 82 · Total Reads: 46006

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Federal Agencies Announce Availability of Sea Turtle Five-year Status Reviews (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE AWARDS $13.2 MILLION IN CLEAN VESSEL ACT GRANTS (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  U.S. FISH AND WILDLIFE SERVICE AWARDS NINE STATE BOATING INFRASTRUCTURE (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  STATE WILDLIFE AGENCIES TO RECEIVE MORE THAN $600 MILLION FOR SPORT FISH (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Loss of Whooping Cranes at Chassahowitzka National Wildlife Refuge After Storms (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Secretary Kempthorne Announces Funding for Wetlands Projects, Additions to Natio (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Critical Habitat Re-Proposed for the Wintering Population of Piping Plovers in N (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service awards Southeast conservation partners for contri (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Kevin M. McMaster Sentenced to 25 Months in Federal Prison For Selling Federally (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Press Conference Call for the National Fish Habitat Action Plan (Dawg)
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Most recent article:

Federal Agencies Announce Availability of Sea Turtle Five-year Status Reviews
by: Dawg
2007-09-03 10:12:54

Federal Agencies Announce Availability of Sea Turtle Five-year Status Reviews


   The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service and the National Marine Fisheries
   Service (Agencies) jointly announced today the completion and
   availability of six five-year status reviews for federally listed sea
   turtles: Olive ridley sea turtle; Kemp’s ridley sea turtle; Leatherback
   sea turtle; Green sea turtle; Hawksbill sea turtle; and Loggerhead sea
   turtle.

   Both agencies share jurisdiction for federally listed sea turtles and
   jointly conducted the reviews.

   After reviewing all of the best scientific and commercially available
   information and data, the agencies’ biologists recommended that the
   current listing classification for the six sea turtle species remain
   unchanged.

   The past decade has seen many technological advances, a diversity of
   research, and completion of numerous on the ground recovery efforts for
   sea turtles through work done by FWS, NMFS, and dedicated sea turtle
   conservation partners in the U.S and many other countries.  This has
   allowed us to better understand the biology of these six sea turtles and
   in some areas improve protection and conservation measures where they
   are showing improvement.  Refer to each five-year review for examples
   and more information on accomplishments and work that is ongoing or
   still must be undertaken to recover the world's sea turtles.

   The five-year reviews and a list of Frequently Asked Questions are
   available online at
http://www.fws.gov/northflorida or may be requested
   by email to
seaturtles@fws.gov, by fax at 904-232-2404, by mail at U.S.
   Fish and Wildlife Service, Attn: Sea Turtle Five-year Reviews, 6620
   Southpoint Drive South, Suite 310, Jacksonville, FL 32216-0958, or by
   telephone at 904/232-2580.  Please include your name and street mailing
   address in your request. E-mail requests will receive an automated
   response confirming receipt of your request.

   NOAA Fisheries Service is dedicated to protecting and preserving our
   nation’s living marine resources and their habitat through scientific
   research, management and enforcement. NOAA Fisheries Service provides
   effective stewardship of these resources for the benefit of the nation,
   supporting coastal communities that depend upon them, and helping to
   provide safe and healthy seafood to consumers and recreational
   opportunities for the American public. To learn more about NOAA
   Fisheries Service, please visit:
http://www.nmfs.noaa.gov.

   The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service is the principal federal agency
   responsible for conserving, protecting and enhancing fish, wildlife,
   plants, and their habitats for the continuing benefit of the American
   people. Visit the Service’s website at
http://www.fws.gov.

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US Corps of Engineers

US Corps of Engineers · Total News: 30 · Total Reads: 23005

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Shallow-draft Inlet Meeting (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Shoaling Reported in Bogue Inlet Channel (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Surveys indicate shoaling in Carolina Beach (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Coastal Communities Navigation Conference (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Corps Wants Ideas On Inlet (reeltrouble)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NOTICE (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Re-Issues Dredge Schedule FY 2005 (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  New Inlet Surveys Added (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Corps and Coast Guard work cooperatively to address shoaled inlets (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Dredging Under Way (Capt_Dave)
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Most recent article:

Shallow-draft Inlet Meeting
by: Capt_Dave
2012-08-06 01:10:17

Shallow-draft Inlet Meeting

 

The Wilmington District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will conduct a Shallow-draft Inlet Meeting at 2:00 pm on Tuesday August 7, 2012.  The meeting will be held at Pearsall Memorial Presbyterian Church located at 3902 Market Street, Wilmington, NC 28403.

 

We will be discussing all project issues for the following five (5) shallow-draft inlets:

 

          1.  Bogue Inlet

          2.  New River Inlet

          3.  New Topsail Inlet

          4.  Carolina Beach Inlet

          5.  Lockwoods Folly Inlet

 

The purpose of the meeting is to inform the users of current project conditions, project funding, and talk about our plans for future work.  This meeting will serve as a forum for navigation beneficiaries to get a better understanding of our dredging program.  Feel free to pass this invite to any project stakeholders that I may have missed. If you have any questions, please give me a call.

Thanks,

 

Bob Keistler

 

 

Robert (Bob) W. Keistler, PE

Project Manager

USACE - Wilmington District

69 Darlington Avenue

Wilmington, NC 28403

 

Telephone:  (910) 251-4709

Email: robert.w.keistler@saw02.usace.army.mil

 

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USCG 5th District

USCG 5th District · Total News: 796 · Total Reads: 442868

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Coast Guard regulates navigation in Oregon Inlet to safeguard mariners, Herbert (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Coast Guard responds to boat allision with Bonner Bridge (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Coast Guard rescues 7 from sinking boat in Diamond Shoals (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Coast Guard medevacs 2 from grounded boat near Morehead City (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Coast Guard reminds fishermen of Atlantic Striped Bass restrictions (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Coast Guard rescues 2 from capsized boat near Shallotte (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Coast Guard assists 2 stranded kayakers near Emerald Isle (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Coast Guard, good Samaritans rescue 4 after vessel sinks 50 miles southeast of B (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Coast Guard advises mariners of Coastal Carolina Railroad Bridge temporary sched (Capt_Dave)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  Boaters are urged to stay safe during Labor Day weekend (Capt_Dave)
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Most recent article:

Coast Guard regulates navigation in Oregon Inlet to safeguard mariners, Herbert
by: Capt_Dave
2014-12-17 11:22:40

Coast Guard regulates navigation in Oregon Inlet to safeguard mariners, Herbert C. Bonner Bridge

 

The Coast Guard established a temporary regulated navigation area Thursday for the navigable waters surrounding the Herbert C. Bonner Bridge in North Carolina.

The RNA allows the Coast Guard to impose vessel traffic restrictions within Oregon Inlet to safeguard vessels from shoaling and to reduce the risk of a bridge strike. The Coast Guard will impose restrictions only when necessary based on inlet conditions, and will provide the public with as much advance notice as possible.

The North Carolina Department of Transportation reports pile supports of the Bonner Bridge have suffered significant section loss and are continually exposed to substructure erosion.

The Bonner Bridge has a fixed channel span with a clearance of 65 feet that crosses Oregon Inlet. When shoaling impacts safe navigation through the fixed channel span, mariners have attempted to transit through alternate spans, which do not have a bridge fender and protection system. A bridge strike to an unprotected element of the Bonner Bridge may endanger motorists and mariners or affect the structural stability of the bridge.  This could cause harm to local businesses and residents of Hatteras Island should damage to the bridge impact safe vessel navigation or vehicular traffic.

The Coast Guard continually monitors local environmental conditions and imposes vessel traffic restrictions tailored to the transportation risk. These restrictions may prohibit vessels of certain drafts, displacements, tonnages or length from navigating through alternate bridge spans.

The Coast Guard invites public feedback and will consider comments in development of a final regulation. Public comments must be received by the Coast Guard on or before Feb. 17, 2015.  The full interim rule can be found and commented on at https://federalregister.gov/a/2014-29589

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Wreck Data

Wreck Data · Total News: 37 · Total Reads: 33192

Articles:

Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  KESHENA (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NORMANNIA (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  NAECO (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  PROTEUS (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  BRITISH SPLENDOUR (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  USS Niphon (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  The Lasting Legacy Of The Blockade Runner 'Modern Greece' (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  DERELICTS (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  MALCHACE (Dawg)
Read this articlePrinter ready versionE-mail to a friend  PAPOOSE (Dawg)
· More -->

Most recent article:

KESHENA
by: Dawg
2006-03-09 12:37:29

KESHENA

U.S. TUG BOAT

Propulsion: Fuel/Oil - Electric Motor

Type: Tug - Tender & Recovery

Tonnage: 427 Gross Tons

Length: 147 Feet

Width: 27 Feet

Armament: Unarmed

 

Remarks:

On wednesday July 15th, 1942 convoy KS 520 is attacked by the U-576, the U-boat drives the convoy into a nearby allied minefield after firing and hitting 3 merchant vessels with torpedoes. One of those vessels was the Panamanian freighter J.A. Mowinkel which had sustained both torpedo and mine damage during the assault but remained afloat. Four days later the Keshena and another tug were sent to recover the Mowinkel as quickly as possible. During towing manuevers however the Keshena strikes another mine and sinks just east of Ocracoke. Two crew members are killed by the mine explosion, the rest of the crew consisting of one woman and 14 men are returned to the Ocracoke Coast Guard Station on Sunday the 19th of July.

Factoid:

During the first six monthes of 1942 U-boats sank hundreds of merchant vessels off the coast of the United States, more than eighty of these ships sank off North Carolina. Due to the geographic location of the outer barrier islands, U-boats could easily escape retaliation by fleeing to nearby deep waters after attacking allied ships. This made places like Cape Lookout shoals and Diamond shoals ideal haunts for marauding subs, slow moving freighters and tankers were easy targets and no match for the German "Wolfpacks".

The coastal waters became so dangerous that Captains referred to our coast as "Torpedo Junction" and dreaded having to travel past our shoals. Ships could burn for weeks at a time and cause many hazards to other ships passing by, including both merchant and military vessels. In response to this increasing aggression by the Germans, the U.S. Navy engaged in offensive and defensive measures to mitigate attacks. Ships and planes were used to conduct escort, patrols and search & destroy missions to defend against U-boats. Merchant ships would be grouped with light cruisers and destroyers in convoys designed to help protect them from enemy attacks and allow them to deliver the much needed cargo to aid the war effort.

Coast Guard crew of the Cutter Spencer setting depth charges.

 

 

GPS:

Lat: N 34 59.950 Lon: W 75 45.820

Depth of wreck: 84'

Data written and compiled by BluewaterBandit

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